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Whats on my bench: Electric Chair Top Plate and Drive Frame

 

Good evening...
I am enjoying seeing what is on everyone else's bench.  And I like getting the little sneak peeks of their shops.  Many thanks to those of you posting your "What's on my Bench".

This is an image of the Electric Chair major components.
  • It is about 22" long and 20" high.
  • Though it looks like one assembly it is two assemblies.  
    • The top plate (the oval plate that has the figures attached to it).  This is the part of the automata that everyone would watch.  There are of course more things coming to this (two heads, a clock, a red telephone, a transformer, a knife switch, an execution counter, and mop and bucket, shoes, walls, etc.
    • The drive frame.  This is the part of the automata that drives all of the motions above the top plate.
  • I decided that I did not want this to be "one big automata".  It would be too difficult to create and maintain.  Instead it will be two major components:
    • The automata proper...The top plate and everything mounted on it.
    • The drive frame...everything below the top plate.
  • I decided that I want to be able to simply lift the top plate off of the drive frame after removing six screws.  This will allow me to create each major component separately.  And to troubleshoot separately. 
  • Being able to simply lift the top plate off of the drive frame is not without complication.  Specifically, the motions that are created in the drive frame need to be transmitted to the automata components that are mounted on the top plate.
  • To enable this I first had to agree with myself that I would limit the linear motion at the interface between the drive frame and top plate to 1/2".
    • This means that anything sitting on the top plate must be able to function with 1/2" of linear motion being transmitted from the drive frame.
    • Or, if circular motion, the coupling must fit within the 1/2".
Next week my "what's on my workbench"  image will show the underside of the top plate.  You will be able to see all of the "receivers" that will then transmit motion to the individual components.
And then in a couple of weeks you should be seeing an image that shows the "transmitters" as they sit at the top of the drive frame.  I've never done this before but I believe that it will work.  I think that I will use leather pads to interface between the drive frame "transmitters" and the top plate "receivers".  And I think that being able to separate these two major components, though more work, will be very worth the effort.  For example, it will make adjusting the seven cams much easier.  I will be able to work with them from the top while they sit right side up.
IMG_20191111_180446.jpg
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California


Mario Núñez
 

Nice work!  I'll be following this project and learning from it.  Nice clean shop, too, in contrast to mine.  When I took this picture of my "clean" bench I was in the process of making a Krenov-style table. 

Mario

 

Hi Mario...
Thanks for your comments.  I'm enjoying this project.
I try to keep my work area uncluttered.  One of the things that I created to help me with this is what I call my MUT (Most Used Tools) rack.  Many of the tools that I use most often I can store and retrieve from a handy rack right on the bench.  Makes cleanup easier.
Your table base looks very nice.  I like that there are lots of curves.
Thanks for your contributions to the forum.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California



On Wed, 13 Nov 2019 at 15:06, Mario Núñez via Groups.Io <nunezm=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Nice work!  I'll be following this project and learning from it.  Nice clean shop, too, in contrast to mine.  When I took this picture of my "clean" bench I was in the process of making a Krenov-style table. 

Mario

Gus
 

Hi Mario,

Good to see you on the forum. That drill press is a nice old machine, still working well ? The boxes are ? Clean shops are nice to look at, messy ones show a busy place, full of energy no ? Bet the owner of a messy shop knows exactly where everything is despite the apparent disorganisation. By the way, I don't see mess in yours.
What do you mostly do in there ?

Regards,
Gus

Mario Núñez
 

Thanks, Jim.  Krenov designed really straightforward furniture, with great lines, but there were always quirks.  In the case of this table it was clamping the three pieces of each leg, which are at odd angles.  The idea of the MUT Rack is solid, and there's that blank and empty wall behind the bench staring at me...

Mario

Mario Núñez
 

Thanks, Gus.  The drill press is a Sprunger from Topeka, Indiana, and from what I've been able to research it's from around 1952.  It still works great, but with a little bit of wobble at the point of the drill bit.  It took two of us to get it down the stairs into my basement shop.  I've made boxes, cutting boards, coffee grinders, pencil holders and that sort of small stuff to take to the two craft shows a year that I attend.  It doesn't make me much money, but it does finance new tools or a stack of nice boards from the local lumberyard.  I've also done some furniture pieces on consignment, done according to what the person who wrote the check wanted and not my taste, on the theory that "I don't see it from my living room."  The Dropbox link will give you a sense of what goes on in that shop.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/s95uoxaf8hib802/AACZVMfZ28buVXIiGy6DR7bga?dl=0

Mario

Gus
 

Hi Mario,
You make lovely things ! Specially the inlay veneer work ! All those projects look like you profession is/was cabinetmaking ?

Regards,
Gus

Mike
 

Mario that is beautiful work, especial eye-catching are the inlay pieces. What process do you use to create them? From the number of photos I can see that you stay very busy.
--
Tag, your it!
Mike

My Website

Mario Núñez
 

Thanks, Gus.  Actually, I worked for 36 years teaching new students at our local community college how to study.  I got into woodworking because I got an estimate for new kitchen cabinets and thought there was no way I could pay that much money for what are really boxes with doors.  I spent a winter sitting at the kitchen table with a sketch pad and a cup of coffee and the next spring wen to work.  Not visible in the picture of the spice cabinet are bookshelves packed with cookbooks on both sides.  The stereo speakers (wires run from the stereo system in the living room under the floor) are there because I can't seem to cook without music.

The veneer work I learned from Marc Adams at his school and from Doug Stowe, who is a remarkable craftsman and teacher. 

Mario

Mario Núñez
 

Thanks, Mike.  Inlay work is interesting because there is a lot of room for experimenting and generally throwing stuff out there to see how it works.  The box I made for a friend's son who had just been promoted to Chief Warrant Officer in the Coast Guard was a rush job.  He needed the box by the way of his promotion ceremony.  Just made it.  The carved box lids were from what I learned in a class taught by Mary May, who is an excellent carver and teacher.  Another Marc Adams School experience.  There are always quirks, of course.  I've made a few funerary urn boxes for ashes, and a table for a church that has back legs that are 14" shorter than the front ones so they can sit up on the second step.  And the kitchen island I made for our friend Cynthia ended up being argued over in her divorce settlement.  She got it.  I do like to keep busy.

Mario

Mario Núñez
 

That of course should be:

"He needed the box by the day of his promotion ceremony."