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Trial

Gus
 

One of the most time consuming parts of my automata work is the carving of characters. In a project taking maybe two months, a third is creating these, without which the "story" has no realism, nothing for the viewer to identify with, or not. Provided of course, the story is worth telling...
Tried this experiment to see if the time can be reduced. Detail carving, sanding etc would follow if this method is successful. The front and side of the female was drawn onto a piece of basswood, taking care to align the various parts. The arms are missing because it would have a movable arm.



Using the scroll saw with a coarse blade, the front view is cut down both sides, as a continuous cut, this is the result.



The two cut sides are tightly taped back on, using a clear packaging tape.



The second cut is the side. So that the piece is stable on the saw table, the first pieces are also taped back on. Interestingly, this cut seems easier, as if the tape somehow lubricates the blade. This is the result.



The tapes are removed, and reveal the character inside. 



The process took some 7 minutes. It seems worth developing.

Thanks for looking,

Gus



Mike
 

Very clever and what a time saver. I look forward to seeing the finished carving.

 

Hi Gus...
Thanks for the idea and the images.
A couple of things for you to consider:
  • Instead of using the plastic wrap consider super glueing the pieces back together.  You place your glue in the waste area so that your final figure isn't glued...just the waste.
  • If you are going to drill anywhere for your joints later in the process...consider instead doing it before you make your cuts.  The block is still square...all the joints are lined up...it's a good time to drill even if you drill just a very small "marker" hole.
Thanks again for sharing.
-Jim-


On Mon, 30 Sep 2019 at 21:05, <klekner@...> wrote:
One of the most time consuming parts of my automata work is the carving of characters. In a project taking maybe two months, a third is creating these, without which the "story" has no realism, nothing for the viewer to identify with, or not. Provided of course, the story is worth telling...
Tried this experiment to see if the time can be reduced. Detail carving, sanding etc would follow if this method is successful. The front and side of the female was drawn onto a piece of basswood, taking care to align the various parts. The arms are missing because it would have a movable arm.



Using the scroll saw with a coarse blade, the front view is cut down both sides, as a continuous cut, this is the result.



The two cut sides are tightly taped back on, using a clear packaging tape.



The second cut is the side. So that the piece is stable on the saw table, the first pieces are also taped back on. Interestingly, this cut seems easier, as if the tape somehow lubricates the blade. This is the result.



The tapes are removed, and reveal the character inside. 



The process took some 7 minutes. It seems worth developing.

Thanks for looking,

Gus



Gus
 

Thanks Mike,

I have not carved the figure to a finished state, more to see what advantages this method might have. The figure shown was mostly sanded, a surprisingly fast way to bring out some features, 40 minutes to get this far. I think there are many advantages, the limitations are that for a figure which will have articulated joints, the drawings would be limited to what this one was, that is, arms in this case missing for later  work. For others, such as say an animal, a prone or standing/sitting male/female figure it seems a very good method. I have used this method for such things as a deer, a dog. Worth developing for the human figure.
Thanks for your interest,
Cheers,
Gus

Gus
 

Hi Jim,

Thanks for your input. Parts of say an arm will enter other parts to make a joint, a blade for example, so not good for this method to include them. My figures are  manipulated from the inside of the body with often complex movements which require tubes inserted into various parts to route cables/wire for this function. This method doesn't seem to be good for that, more for rigid figures, with maybe a head or torso movement, or added after.

Regards,
Gus

 

Hi Gus...
I know this is asking a lot...  I would love to see a photo series (or a video) of how you manipulate from inside the body.  When I do manipulation from inside the body it always gets a bit complicated.  I'd love to see how you do it.  Some day...
Thanks
-Jim-

On Tue, 1 Oct 2019 at 22:32, <klekner@...> wrote:
Hi Jim,

Thanks for your input. Parts of say an arm will enter other parts to make a joint, a blade for example, so not good for this method to include them. My figures are  manipulated from the inside of the body with often complex movements which require tubes inserted into various parts to route cables/wire for this function. This method doesn't seem to be good for that, more for rigid figures, with maybe a head or torso movement, or added after.

Regards,
Gus

Gus
 
Edited

Hi Jim,

The attached photo is a short story about ageing and what can accompany it. I haven't made a video of it, at least not one which is watchable, but having decided that videos are a must, I will "have a go" this weekend. If worth looking at, I will post the link to it, and will also have some build photos, showing how the movements are achieved. The old man bends from the waist, turns the head and extends the arm trying to retrieve the false teeth which popped out and are on the floor below. 

Regards,
Gus


                                 "AGEING DISGRACEFULLY"

Mike
 

Beautiful work Gus! I am eager to see the video.

 

Good morning Gus...
I love this kind of automata.  Just a simple thing...reaching for teeth...and cannot reach them.  A perfect subject.  It looks like you are doing an excellent job.  I look forward to seeing the video.
Thanks for sharing.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California



On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 at 17:21, <klekner@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]
[Reason: Added title]

Hi Jim,

The attached photo is a short story about ageing and what can accompany it. I haven't made a video of it, at least not one which is watchable, but having decided that videos are a must, I will "have a go" this weekend. If worth looking at, I will post the link to it, and will also have some build photos, showing how the movements are achieved. The old man bends from the waist, turns the head and extends the arm trying to retrieve the false teeth which popped out and are on the floor below. 

Regards,
Gus


                                 "AGEING DISGRACEFULLY"

Gus
 

Hi Jim,
The video can be seen here,  “https://player.vimeo.com/video/364660062, has  sound at one point only.

This photo is the assembled character. The hollowed out torso will contain the mechanisms which control the bend, the arm extension and the head turns. It is 230mm high.



The following photo shows how the control cables are routed to the upper body. Brass tubes are are buried in each leg, the left is for the head turning, the right is for the bend. The diameter difference is because the left has two cables.



This photo shows the tube for the bend cable emerging. The S/S cable pulls the torso down controlled by a cam below. The spring returns it to vertical, the hinge allows for the bend.



The various internal mechs are seen here, as is the cable which creates the bend. 



There is a round dowel which protrudes through the base of the torso, and rests on the top surface of the 
lower body. It attaches to the left arm by a small  lever. As the torso bends, the dowel turns the arm pivot at the same time. The return spring also assists in returning the torso to vertical.

The next photo is a close up of the head turn cable, emerging through the base of the torso, is routed through brass eyelets. It is wound onto the dowel which turns through a small bearing, head is attached to this. The cable is wound onto the dowel, and as the cable is pulled in one direction then the other, the head turns. Because the dowel is only 5mm, small movements from the cam below will move the head.



This photo shows the cam, the follower, and the pivoted lever and the cables attached to it below the stage. Next to it is the cam controlling the bend.



I hope this explains how the movements  are controlled from within the body. I am in the process of posting videos of these, link to follow soon. 

Regards,
Gus


 

Hi Gus...
A very delightful automata.  I love all the little details, both above and below.
I appreciate you taking the time to photograph and post.  I've never buried a tube into a leg like that before...don't know that I would have even thought of it.
The motions are complex and relate well.
He sort of reminds me of me...I've got dentures and it's hard for me to bend over...though fortunately I still can.  And the wife and dog are great!
I appreciate your craftsmanship.  What are you using for cable?
Thanks for sharing.  I look forward to seeing the final video.  A great little automata.
Cheers
-Jim-

On Mon, 7 Oct 2019 at 16:59, <klekner@...> wrote:
Hi Jim,
The video can be seen here,  https://player.vimeo.com/video/364660062, has  sound at one point only.

This photo is the assembled character. The hollowed out torso will contain the mechanisms which control the bend, the arm extension and the head turns. It is 230mm high.



The following photo shows how the control cables are routed to the upper body. Brass tubes are are buried in each leg, the left is for the head turning, the right is for the bend. The diameter difference is because the left has two cables.



This photo shows the tube for the bend cable emerging. The S/S cable pulls the torso down controlled by a cam below. The spring returns it to vertical, the hinge allows for the bend.



The various internal mechs are seen here, as is the cable which creates the bend. 



There is a round dowel which protrudes through the base of the torso, and rests on the top surface of the 
lower body. It attaches to the left arm by a small  lever. As the torso bends, the dowel turns the arm pivot at the same time. The return spring also assists in returning the torso to vertical.

The next photo is a close up of the head turn cable, emerging through the base of the torso, is routed through brass eyelets. It is wound onto the dowel which turns through a small bearing, head is attached to this. The cable is wound onto the dowel, and as the cable is pulled in one direction then the other, the head turns. Because the dowel is only 5mm, small movements from the cam below will move the head.



This photo shows the cam, the follower, and the pivoted lever and the cables attached to it below the stage. Next to it is the cam controlling the bend.



I hope this explains how the movements  are controlled from within the body. I am in the process of posting videos of these, link to follow soon. 

Regards,
Gus


Gus
 

Hi Jim,
Thanks very much for your comments ! The other videos will be only showing the mechanisms of the movements I described above, not an addition to the video already posted, will probably be named "Ageing Disgracefully Mechanisms".
I use stainless fishing wire for the more heavy duty movements, in this case for the bend, and a beading line (available from beading shops) for anything else, 18lb breaking strength. It is equivalent to the stainless wire breaking strength. Using swages available from fishing shops to terminate, sometimes two if there is likely heavy loads. The size of the automata, which I forgot to state is 500mm wide,
440mm high, 280 deep.

Regards,
Gus

Mike
 

Gus, I loved seeing the video and the photos showing how things worked. It is very educational for me - thanks for sharing it with us.

Mike

veeracer@...
 

Wow! Very nicely done. I could only hope that I will some day have this amount of talent in my builds.

Gus
 

Thanks very much for the comment Mike !

Gus
 

Thank you Veeracer, appreciate your comment,
Cheers
Gus

Gus
 

The video of the main character's mechanics is now on Vimeo,  https://vimeo.com/371499802

Regards,
Gus

 

Hi Gus...
Thanks for posting the link.  I paused for each section so that I could get a closer look.  Good work.  Looks like some tight quarters there in the torso.
Thanks for sharing.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
San Diego

On Wed, 6 Nov 2019 at 14:47, <klekner@...> wrote:
The video of the main character's mechanics is now on Vimeo,  https://vimeo.com/371499802

Regards,
Gus