Date   
Re: What's On My Bench - The head of Augustus

Randy
 

Hi Jim,

There are a few tricks that are learned with experience. But there is trial and error too. Rapid prototyping is one of the key advantages of 3D printing.
It's fun.

-Randy

Re: What's On My Bench - The head of Augustus

 

Hi Randy...
This is interesting.  I suppose that there are many non-intuitive little tricks and hacks to 3D printing that a non-user (such as myself) would never think of.
Thanks for sharing.  It's appreciated.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California



On Thu, 21 Nov 2019 at 18:06, Randy <rglissmann@...> wrote:
A dozen or so famous Greek busts have been made available for reproduction using a 3D printer. This link discusses what is available and how they became available. I thought it would be interesting to embed a LED inside the head so to have glowing eyes. I imported the head's STL file into Fusion 360 and created a hollow space inside the head for a LED. I printed the modified STL file up to the eyes, then paused the printer and inserted the LED. Finally, I resumed the printing of the head. Here are photos of my low resolution test prints.

What's On My Bench - The head of Augustus

Randy
 

A dozen or so famous Greek busts have been made available for reproduction using a 3D printer. This link discusses what is available and how they became available. I thought it would be interesting to embed a LED inside the head so to have glowing eyes. I imported the head's STL file into Fusion 360 and created a hollow space inside the head for a LED. I printed the modified STL file up to the eyes, then paused the printer and inserted the LED. Finally, I resumed the printing of the head. Here are photos of my low resolution test prints.

What's on my Bench: Bearings

 

Good morning...
I've got two automata projects on my bench right now, Inclined Slide and Electric Chair.  Each of these automata will use bearings.
In the image below you see five bearings:
  • The top 3 are linear bearings.  Inside the outer sleeve are four races of small bearing balls.  I will be using these bearings in the Inclined Slide automata...there will be four of them that hold the seat that the biped will be sliding back and forth.  As these bearings slide/roll along the 6mm shaft they make more noise than I was expecting.  It will be interesting to see if they quiet down over time. I source these from ServoCity.com.
  • The lower 2 bearings are one way bearings.  I will be using these in both the Inclined Slide and Electric Chair automata.  I use them as clutches.  This enables me to operate automata with both a hand crank and a motor.  The two clutches isolate the crank and the motor from each other.  I source these from VXB.com.
I maintain a stock of stainless steel precision shafting in sizes 1/8, 3/16, and 1/4".  These are ordered in 12" lengths.  I would prefer to use precision hardwood shafting...but it is not available.  None of the wood dowels that I use fit properly into the bearings.
And I maintain a stock of ball bearing assemblies (1/8" ID-1/4" OD, 3/16" ID -3/8" OD , and 1/4" ID-1/2" OD  ) in both flanged and unflanged configurations.
The motors that I use are 60 rpm gear motors. I personally think that a hand crank speed of 60-90 rpm is desirable.  Using a motor of 60 rpm permits the use of one input shaft.
IMG_20191120_071600-1000.jpg
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California


Re: What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

 

Hi Randy...and everyone:
I find this additive printing very fascinating.  I don't do it myself (yet) but am really enjoying and appreciating how additive printing is emerging into our society.  This is a brand new tool that our species is learning how to use.  Just off the top of my head I've seen plastic (of course), skin, food, metal including titanium, concrete...and I'm sure that there are many more things.  It will be interesting to watch how additive printing enters the field of automata.
Thanks for showing us what's on your bench, Randy
--
-Jim Coffee-
creating automata near San Diego, California
one of the group moderators
JamesCoffee.com

Re: What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

 

Nice video...I especially like the close-ups of the innards.  I love all the metal.
Thanks for sharing.
-Jim-

On Tue, 19 Nov 2019 at 17:25, Mike <smc5910@...> wrote:
Randy,

You "may" appreciate this, in regards to fluid motion mechanisms: 
http://www.francoisjunod.com/2015/12/14/automates-tapis-volant/

At times, the 3D modeling process boggles my mind. I am grateful for those who can think in that dimension. 
--
Looking forward to hearing about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities

Re: What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

Mike
 

Randy,

You "may" appreciate this, in regards to fluid motion mechanisms: 
http://www.francoisjunod.com/2015/12/14/automates-tapis-volant/

At times, the 3D modeling process boggles my mind. I am grateful for those who can think in that dimension. 
--
Looking forward to hearing about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities

Re: What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

Randy
 

I use Fusion 360 to design and create STL files and then Cura to slice the object into layers that the 3D printer uses. I'm totally amazed at what can be done using Fusion and it's free for hobbyists.

Re: What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

Mike
 

Hello Randy and welcome to the forum! I hope you enjoy your time here and I look forward to interacting with you. You have alot of interesting gadgets in the background. :)

That is an impressive automata you are building and a very interesting combinations of technology.  What software do you use to model the 3D files that you print?
--
Looking forward to hearing more about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities

What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

Randy
 

This is my first posting. I'm working on a kinetic sculpture for wall mounting that incorporates timing belts and stepper motors to rotate U shapes. The belts cause the shapes move synchronously in each column and a microprocessor controls the rotation angle, rate, and direction of each column. I plan to have different patterns of movement to replicate the undulations of water ripples or the wind blowing a wheat field. I've completely moved from wood to using a 3D printer for my creations. I'm easily distracted into making other things but now I have a deadline for submitting this sculpture in a local art show.

Re: What's On My Bench - Colorado Christmas

Mario Núñez
 

Very nice.  I look forward to watching this one at work.

Mario

Re: Favorite Suppliers

Gus
 

Mike,
That is just amazing ! At the prices and availability of gears, why would anyone in the US make their own  :-))

Gus

Re: Tools of the Trade

 

Good evening...
I would like to add another favorite tool of mine...a small speed square that I created.
In the image you see a large aluminum speed square (which I never use in my studio).  And you see a nice Inca speed square...stainless steel and a pleasure to use.  And you see a little green speed square...it's one that I made and that gets the most use in my studio.
I created the little speed square in several sizes...and the one that you see is the size that won.  The one thing that I don't like about it is it's weight...it is very lite...I would like more heft.
So one of these days I'll order some brass sheet and make a small brass speed square.  This will be good practise for me (working with brass and silver solder) and I'll end up with a square that will live longer than I will.
And just a quick note about the 'green' color.  That is forest green camo...my studio color.  When I make a tool, or a holder, or a template, or when I refinish a hand or power tool, I will paint it this green color.  To me, it gives my studio some continuity...and I am less apt to confuse a template for an available piece of wood.

--
-Jim Coffee-
creating automata near San Diego, California
one of the group moderators
JamesCoffee.com

Re: What's On My Bench - Colorado Christmas

Mike
 

I forgot to update my website in the signature - "If" you want to check it out it is now called Wooden Curiosities
--
 I look forward to hearing about your automata adventures!

Mike

Wooden Curiosities

Re: Favorite Suppliers

 

Hi Mike...
This guy makes some fun stuff, doesn't he.

On Mon, 18 Nov 2019 at 16:59, Mike <smc5910@...> wrote:
I found another outstanding resource today. Cranky Crab Workshop - Wooden Widgets and and Machined Mechanisms. they do custom orders as well. So if you need help with wooden gears check them out on Etsy. Their customer service is exceptional and they are a pleasure to work with. 
--
Tag, your it!
Mike

My Website

What's On My Bench - Colorado Christmas

Mike
 

As Jim suggested it will be easier to follow the progress of projects if we post a separate topic for each of them.

The last few days have been bitter sweet for me. Saturday, my CNC went bonkers on a simple cut that has been done several times in the past and drilled through the wood and into the table bed.I don't trust the beast very much and was thankfully was able to hit the emergency stop before more damage was done. I power cycled the machine and loaded a different file that is also used quite often, this time just the opposite happened as it attempted to push the router through the roof. <sigh> Needless to say they don't make things like they used to. I shipped the controller to the MFG, hopefully it isn't too expensive to repair.

On a brighter note, I was able to obtain a scroll saw on Sunday, which I have wanted for some time. 

Through all of that, a wedding and revamping the website, I was able to make progress on what I am now calling "Colorado Christmas." (My grandsons live in that beautiful state). Pictures follow below. 

Painted Reindeer


With Santa


Cams - Made them heavy to behave as quasi flywheels and hopefully last longer. Coated the interior with bee's wax.


New scroll saw


--
Tag, your it!
Mike

My Website

Re: Favorite Suppliers

Mike
 

I found another outstanding resource today. Cranky Crab Workshop - Wooden Widgets and and Machined Mechanisms. they do custom orders as well. So if you need help with wooden gears check them out on Etsy. Their customer service is exceptional and they are a pleasure to work with. 
--
Tag, your it!
Mike

My Website

Re: Whats on my bench: Electric Chair Top Plate and Drive Frame

Mario Núñez
 

That of course should be:

"He needed the box by the day of his promotion ceremony."

Re: Whats on my bench: Electric Chair Top Plate and Drive Frame

Mario Núñez
 

Thanks, Mike.  Inlay work is interesting because there is a lot of room for experimenting and generally throwing stuff out there to see how it works.  The box I made for a friend's son who had just been promoted to Chief Warrant Officer in the Coast Guard was a rush job.  He needed the box by the way of his promotion ceremony.  Just made it.  The carved box lids were from what I learned in a class taught by Mary May, who is an excellent carver and teacher.  Another Marc Adams School experience.  There are always quirks, of course.  I've made a few funerary urn boxes for ashes, and a table for a church that has back legs that are 14" shorter than the front ones so they can sit up on the second step.  And the kitchen island I made for our friend Cynthia ended up being argued over in her divorce settlement.  She got it.  I do like to keep busy.

Mario

Re: Whats on my bench: Electric Chair Top Plate and Drive Frame

Mario Núñez
 

Thanks, Gus.  Actually, I worked for 36 years teaching new students at our local community college how to study.  I got into woodworking because I got an estimate for new kitchen cabinets and thought there was no way I could pay that much money for what are really boxes with doors.  I spent a winter sitting at the kitchen table with a sketch pad and a cup of coffee and the next spring wen to work.  Not visible in the picture of the spice cabinet are bookshelves packed with cookbooks on both sides.  The stereo speakers (wires run from the stereo system in the living room under the floor) are there because I can't seem to cook without music.

The veneer work I learned from Marc Adams at his school and from Doug Stowe, who is a remarkable craftsman and teacher. 

Mario