Date   
Re: Mixing Media Within the Mechanics

 

Hi MIke...
Interesting question.  It will be interesting reading the responses.
In my case:
  1. I like to work with wood...so start there.
  2. I like "smooth and quiet".
  3. I never rotate (or slide) wood inside of wood.  I always use either a nylon bushing (for a partial rotation) or a ball bearing assembly (for full rotation).
  4. The size automata that I create cause me to work with shafts 1/8, 3/16, and 1/4" diameter.  
  5. If I am doing something simple that is not high tolerance I will use a wood shaft inside nylon bearings.  The wood dowels are not the right size for the ball bearing assemblies...they are always too large...and a pain to install.
  6. I use 1/4" stainless steel shafting and ball bearings for things that rotate.
    1. When attaching things to the stainless shaft I normal clamp onto the shaft.
    2. The 1/4" shafting comes in a D profile.  I prefer using this D profile because it permits the clamps to get a better grip.
    3. Hubs are also available.
    4. I source my shafting, bearings, hubs, and spacers from ServoCity.com.
Good question.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
enjoying the 'sport' of automata near San Diego, California.


On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 at 09:39, Mike <smc5910@...> wrote:
I was wondering about the pros and cons of mixing media within the mechanics of our autuomata. For example could I use a brass, aluminum or steel rod in place of a wooden dowel rod, but then have wooden cams, cranks, gears and levels attached to the metal rod? Over a certain length I guess all rods tend to flex. Or would it be wiser to simply add support posts at the point of flex? I hope this makes sense.
--


Mike

Wooden Curiosities

Re: What's on my bench: Progress, and a mess

 

Hi Guys...
They are not large...smaller than a pack of cigarettes.  That said...that can be huge...depending on where it is to be used.
I source from Amazon or eBay.  Search eBay for "mechanical counter".  Expect to pay between $5-10.  An important consideration when ordering is how many cycles you want to count.  A six digit counter will go to 999,999 and then start over.  I typically source 6 or 7 digit counters.  
They operate with either a pull (or a push).  Not lots of effort is required.  There is a "click" noise, which can be a distraction. 
I've attached 3 images.  
  1. Close up
  2. Installed facing forward.
  3. Installed on the back.
As I mentioned earlier, I like to install counters because I get a sense of how well the machine is performing.  And I find it interesting knowing how many cycles the machine has operated.  And other people almost always make a (positive) counter comment.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
LRM_20180626_102153-1000.jpg
_JCS5070-1000.jpg
IMG_20190821_070906-1000-2.jpg


On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 at 08:37, V Bass <vrbass@...> wrote:
That's a really interesting idea, Jim. Can you tell us more about them -- size, source, etc?

Vance

On December 21, 2019 8:40:28 AM MST, Jim Coffee <jim@...> wrote:
>Good morning Mike...
>I install mechanical counters into all of my automata. 





Re: Mixing Media Within the Mechanics

Automata Magazine
 

Hi Mike,

In my experience, mixing materials is fine. I always do. I started using only wood but found that climate and weather affected it to the point that, if you are working to fairly close tolerances, the whole thing would bind up in damp weather. Once I started using brass for the shafts, that problem was solved. I try to stay with wood when possible but also try to evaluate what will be the best material for the application. —Marc

On Dec 21, 2019, at 10:39 AM, Mike <smc5910@...> wrote:

I was wondering about the pros and cons of mixing media within the mechanics of our autuomata. For example could I use a brass, aluminum or steel rod in place of a wooden dowel rod, but then have wooden cams, cranks, gears and levels attached to the metal rod? Over a certain length I guess all rods tend to flex. Or would it be wiser to simply add support posts at the point of flex? I hope this makes sense.
--


Mike

Wooden Curiosities


Mixing Media Within the Mechanics

Mike
 

I was wondering about the pros and cons of mixing media within the mechanics of our autuomata. For example could I use a brass, aluminum or steel rod in place of a wooden dowel rod, but then have wooden cams, cranks, gears and levels attached to the metal rod? Over a certain length I guess all rods tend to flex. Or would it be wiser to simply add support posts at the point of flex? I hope this makes sense.
--


Mike

Wooden Curiosities

Re: What's on my bench: Progress, and a mess

Mike
 

Jim, That is a nice touch. I'd be interested to know where you source them and see an example of how you install them.
--
Ho Ho Ho


Mike

Wooden Curiosities

Re: What's on my bench: Progress, and a mess

V Bass
 

That's a really interesting idea, Jim. Can you tell us more about them -- size, source, etc?

Vance

On December 21, 2019 8:40:28 AM MST, Jim Coffee <@jwcoffee> wrote:
Good morning Mike...
I install mechanical counters into all of my automata.

Re: What's on my bench: Progress, and a mess

 

Good morning Mike...
I install mechanical counters into all of my automata.  Some of the time they are hidden...but sometimes they are visible.  For example in the case of the Electric Chair the counter counts executions.  The other automata that I've got on my bench right now is an exercise machine.  I've got the counter facing the biped so that he can know how much exercise he has done.
I find the counters interesting...other people find them interesting...and they help me understand use and repair cycles.  Big Wheel Lift #1 (the one I take into public with me) has cycled more than 36,000 marbles at this point...and is seeming to be running strong.
Cheers
-Jim-


On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 at 03:58, Mike <smc5910@...> wrote:
Jim, your making great progress, the addition really add to the scene. What is hanging on the wall in the prisoner's room?
I like seeing messy work spaces, it doesn't shock me at all, they seem more alive.
-- 

Mike

Wooden Curiosities

Re: What's on my bench: Progress, and a mess

Mike
 

Jim, your making great progress, the addition really add to the scene. What is hanging on the wall in the prisoner's room?
I like seeing messy work spaces, it doesn't shock me at all, they seem more alive.
-- 

Mike

Wooden Curiosities

Re: What Was on the Bench

Mike
 

Gus, such a lovey piece, it really moves one's heart to see all the care and love you put into this automata.
The finish is like glass. This is a heirloom piece if I've ever seen one. Splendid job.
--
Have a very merry Christmas everyone!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities

Re: What's on my bench -- moving eyeballs

Gus
 

Thanks very much Marc, that is a nice method, filed away for future use ! 

All the best for the holiday period to you and yours,

Regards,
Gus

Re: What's on my bench -- moving eyeballs

Automata Magazine
 


On Dec 20, 2019, at 7:34 PM, Gus <klekner@...> wrote:

Hi Marc,
This is something I experimented with when I first got the mini lathe, but not having experience with the machine, my result was ordinary to say the least. It is very small, 6mm doll eyes I purchased online from a company since disappeared.

Your prototype works very nicely. Is the "T" bar under pivoted in line with the horizontal center of the eyes ? Please detail how you drilled the eyes on your lathe.

This is my setup, not universally rotatable. Two rings sorround each eye, the rings can rotate up/down. Each eye is drilled "vertically",
that is the side to side movement. The shockingly inaccurate drilling makes the whole lot a failure, but has possibility once I learn how to drill such small round things accurately.



Thanks for the post,
Regards,
Gustav

Attachments:


Hi Gus,

Here’s how I made my eyeballs.

1. I first made a split-ring collet that fit the eyeball well.

2. I put it in the lathe and drilled the first hole. The result is in the third picture, with the stem in place.

3. I then returned the collet & eyeball to the lathe, with the stem sticking up through the little cutout in the slot of the collet. I pressed the stem tightly against the jaw of the lathe chuck, then tightened the chuck. This gave me the 90-gegree angle I needed between the two stems. Then I drilled the second hole.

You can see in the last picture that the two stems are precisely 90 degrees apart. Also, I didn’t add the irises until the mechanism was complete. You’ll have to find a way to hold the eyeballs so the the irises are looking straight back before the backs can be drilled.

Hope the helps, 
Marc










Re: What Was on the Bench

 

Hi Gus...
This is a really nice interpretation of the wave machine.  She will love this.
It's also a nice Valentines Day theme.
Your finish is very nice.  What material and finish did you use for the hearts?
Thanks for sharing.
-Jim Coffee-

On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 at 18:52, Gus <klekner@...> wrote:
My Grand  daughter's 13th birthday presented a difficulty. What on earth can you present her for this very important (so I was told)
day ? Besides, she seems to have everything else........The decision was to make this, not convinced it qualifies as an automaton, more like a plaything, but hoping she will like it.



A video of it can be seen here: https://vimeo.com/371499802

I wish all a safe and happy Christmas !

Regards,

Gustav

What Was on the Bench

Gus
 
Edited

My Grand  daughter's 13th birthday presented a difficulty. What on earth can you present her for this very important (so I was told)
day ? Besides, she seems to have everything else........The decision was to make this, not convinced it qualifies as an automaton, more like a plaything, but hoping she will like it.



A video of it can be seen here: https://vimeo.com/380840237

I wish all a safe and happy Christmas !

Regards,

Gustav

Re: What's on my bench -- moving eyeballs

Gus
 

Hi Marc,
This is something I experimented with when I first got the mini lathe, but not having experience with the machine, my result was ordinary to say the least. It is very small, 6mm doll eyes I purchased online from a company since disappeared.

Your prototype works very nicely. Is the "T" bar under pivoted in line with the horizontal center of the eyes ? Please detail how you drilled the eyes on your lathe.

This is my setup, not universally rotatable. Two rings sorround each eye, the rings can rotate up/down. Each eye is drilled "vertically",
that is the side to side movement. The shockingly inaccurate drilling makes the whole lot a failure, but has possibility once I learn how to drill such small round things accurately.



Thanks for the post,
Regards,
Gustav

What's on my bench: Progress, and a mess

 

The top portion of the Electric Chair is completed in terms of all of the items that will move have been installed.  Still lots to do, of course, but at this time I have started working on the drive frame.  The big spoked wheels that you see are pulleys that will reduce handle crank speed (and motor speed) of 60 rpm down to 1 rpm.  I need both speeds (60 rpm and 1 rpm) in the drive frame.
Also pictured is a mess.  This is what my bench looks like just before I straighten things out.
Happy Holidays everyone.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California

IMG_20191220_170733-1000.jpg

Re: What's on my bench -- moving eyeballs

Mike
 

Marc you did a wonderful job! Quite a bit of thought went into this project and it shows. Movable eyes add so much life to a character. 
--
Looking forward to hearing about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities

Re: What's on my bench -- moving eyeballs

Automata Magazine
 

Hi Jim,

Thanks for your comments. Part of the mechanism is silver soldered. Most bits are soft soldered. I have a resistance soldering unit that allows me to do very small work.

Yes, the bottom of the ball just has a hole in it into which a 1/32” pin fits. Likewise the pin the goes into the back of the eyeball. The trick was getting the holes 90 degrees apart. I did all the holes on my lathe.

Best,
Marc



On Dec 16, 2019, at 8:57 PM, Jim Coffee <jim@...> wrote:

Hi Marc...
Good to hear from you.
So tiny!  Fascinating.  They seem to work well...and they look good.
Soft solder or silver solder?
What do the bottoms of the balls look like?  Just a hole that sits on a pin?
I look forward to seeing what you do with this.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-

On Mon, 16 Dec 2019 at 16:20, Automata Magazine <automatamag@...> wrote:
I’ve been contemplating an automaton that would require eyeballs that could move in pretty much any direction. There are several examples of this in Ellen Rixford’s excellent book, Figures in the Fourth Dimension. Based on what I learned there, attached are photos of what I came up with. My main concern was how small I wanted to work. They eyeballs are 3/8” (9mm) wooden balls. You can see them in action here: https://youtu.be/7_CgscV-TKo In an actual automaton, the lever would be actuated by a pair of cams, or something similar. —Marc



Attachments:


Re: What's on my bench -- moving eyeballs

 

Hi Marc...
Good to hear from you.
So tiny!  Fascinating.  They seem to work well...and they look good.
Soft solder or silver solder?
What do the bottoms of the balls look like?  Just a hole that sits on a pin?
I look forward to seeing what you do with this.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-

On Mon, 16 Dec 2019 at 16:20, Automata Magazine <automatamag@...> wrote:
I’ve been contemplating an automaton that would require eyeballs that could move in pretty much any direction. There are several examples of this in Ellen Rixford’s excellent book, Figures in the Fourth Dimension. Based on what I learned there, attached are photos of what I came up with. My main concern was how small I wanted to work. They eyeballs are 3/8” (9mm) wooden balls. You can see them in action here: https://youtu.be/7_CgscV-TKo In an actual automaton, the lever would be actuated by a pair of cams, or something similar. —Marc

What's on my bench -- moving eyeballs

Automata Magazine
 

I’ve been contemplating an automaton that would require eyeballs that could move in pretty much any direction. There are several examples of this in Ellen Rixford’s excellent book, Figures in the Fourth Dimension. Based on what I learned there, attached are photos of what I came up with. My main concern was how small I wanted to work. They eyeballs are 3/8” (9mm) wooden balls. You can see them in action here: https://youtu.be/7_CgscV-TKo In an actual automaton, the lever would be actuated by a pair of cams, or something similar. —Marc

How to start a new topic

 

Good afternoon everyone.  I just had a subscriber ask me "how do I post a new thread, how do I add photos and video, and where is the list of topics?"  I feel that if one person has this question there are probably others...so I am posting the answers here.

How do I post a New Topic?  There are two ways:
  1. From your email application address an email to the group (automata@automatamagazine.groups.io). Fill in the Subject, and then type your message.  Then Send.  Your new message will be sent to all members of the group.
  2. From your browser go to the Automata Magazine group forum on the Internet (https://automatamagazine.groups.io/g/automata).  Scan down the menu until you see New Topic.  Click on New Topic and you will be taken to a screen that will let you post a new message.
How to add images and video?
  1. First, note that video files are too large for this group forum...so they won't be accepted.  You should instead send a link to your video.  Your video may be hosted anywhere.  I host mine at YouTube.
  2. If you are using your email application to make the post simply attach an image(s).  The image(s) will be resized by the groups.io platform to max dimension 1000 pixels.
  3. If you are posting your new post from the forum website, look up into the toolbar and you will see an "Add Pictures" icon.
Is there a list of topics?:
  1. There is no drop down that shows a list of topics.
  2. If you want to make a post about "My Favorite Suppliers" simply include that text in the subject line.  Same with "What's on My Workbench".  Simply include in the subject line something like this..."What's On My Bench: This is how I animate a lizard tail".

I note that there is not this kind of "How do I make a new post" info in our Wiki, I'll add it.  If anyone finds any of the above unclear please reply to this post and I'll try to help you. 

Bottom line...we love Automata conversation!

--
-Jim Coffee-
creating automata near San Diego, California
one of the group moderators
JamesCoffee.com