Date   
Re: What's On My Bench - The Guards of Medusa

 

Hi Randy...
If I am reading this correctly it turns on when someone is near...and off when they are not.  Neat.
What operating system do you use?  
Yes, your tree is nice...good job.
Thanks
-Jim-


On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 at 10:40, Randy <rglissmann@...> wrote:
  1. Approx how large?
    It's around 8" wide and 6" tall. The maximum footprint that I can print using my 3D printer is about 8.5 x 8.5.
  2. What is it made of?
    Everything was printed using PLA (polylactic acid). It's the most common filament used with 3D printers. Around 20 parts were designed.
  3. How did you paint?
    I airbrushed acrylic paint on white PLA parts and then applied a protective coat of lacquer. I'm especially proud of the red tree. I found an image on the internet and used it to cut a stencil.
  4. Can you describe the electro-mechanical a bit?
    Servo motors rotate the two guards and the Medusa head is raised using a stepper motor. A microprocessor controls the sequence of motion.
  5. What does it sound like
    The servos are very quiet. The stepper has a slight hum similar to an oscillating fan. I have a PIR sensor which turns it off when no one is in the room.

Re: What's On My Bench - The Guards of Medusa

Randy
 

  1. Approx how large?
    It's around 8" wide and 6" tall. The maximum footprint that I can print using my 3D printer is about 8.5 x 8.5.
  2. What is it made of?
    Everything was printed using PLA (polylactic acid). It's the most common filament used with 3D printers. Around 20 parts were designed.
  3. How did you paint?
    I airbrushed acrylic paint on white PLA parts and then applied a protective coat of lacquer. I'm especially proud of the red tree. I found an image on the internet and used it to cut a stencil.
  4. Can you describe the electro-mechanical a bit?
    Servo motors rotate the two guards and the Medusa head is raised using a stepper motor. A microprocessor controls the sequence of motion.
  5. What does it sound like
    The servos are very quiet. The stepper has a slight hum similar to an oscillating fan. I have a PIR sensor which turns it off when no one is in the room.

Re: What's On My Bench - The Guards of Medusa

 

Hi Randy...
Very interesting.  Can you tell us more?
  1. Approx how large?
  2. What is it made of?
  3. How did you paint?
  4. Can you describe the electro-mechanical a bit?
  5. What does it sound like?
To me, it is very interesting seeing what is on other people's benches.  Lots to be learned and shared.
Thanks for posting.
-Jim Coffee-


On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 at 07:33, Randy <rglissmann@...> wrote:
I'm finally ready to show my creation after several months of development.
I thought it would be easier, but the next one will. Here is a link to a video.

Re: What's On My Bench - The Guards of Medusa

Randy
 

I'm new to Youtube. Please try it again.

-Randy

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 8:53 AM Jim Coffee <jim@...> wrote:
Morning Randy...
Thanks for posting.  Looks very interesting.
The video does not open...says it is Private.  Perhaps you could change the setting?
Thanks
-Jim Coffee-

On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 at 07:33, Randy <rglissmann@...> wrote:
I'm finally ready to show my creation after several months of development.
I thought it would be easier, but the next one will. Here is a link to a video.

Attachments:

Re: What's On My Bench - The Guards of Medusa

 

Morning Randy...
Thanks for posting.  Looks very interesting.
The video does not open...says it is Private.  Perhaps you could change the setting?
Thanks
-Jim Coffee-

On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 at 07:33, Randy <rglissmann@...> wrote:
I'm finally ready to show my creation after several months of development.
I thought it would be easier, but the next one will. Here is a link to a video.

What's On My Bench - The Guards of Medusa

Randy
 

I'm finally ready to show my creation after several months of development.
I thought it would be easier, but the next one will. Here is a link to a video.

Miniatur Wunderland: Is it an automata? Does it contain many automata?

 

My vote is Yes.
I ran into this on YouTube a while ago...probably years ago.  It was not until the last month or so that I equated Miniatur Wunderland to automata.  Here is a link to their YouTube channel.
In the beginning I thought of Miniatur Wunderland as being a large model railroad layout.  It was not until I had watched many of the videos that I realized that this is not a large model railroad...rather it is a large automata that shows what and how people are.  And there is humor...take a look at this segment...starting at about minute 2:05.
Some of my favorite videos have the word "Wundurlandian" in the title.  These videos are about the individuals that are creating / maintaining Miniatur Wunderland.
Not long ago in this forum someone raised the question about 'how do we pass our automata interests/skills to the younger generation?'.  I find it interesting to note that many of the Miniatur Wunderlandians are young.  They are not like us old folks (speaking for myself)...rather they are younger, have different interests and values and skill sets.  They work with more modern tools and materials, including electronics.
Details are important.  For example, one of the young Wunderlandians (he does not drive) has the sole responsibility for all of the street sign details.  
A few details from their home page:
  • 1,490 meters square
  • 9,250 cars
  • 760,000 construction hours so far
  • 260,000 figures
  • 1,040 trains
  • 35,000,000 euros building costs
  • 4,110 buildings
  • 42 airplanes
  • 385,000 leds
  • 130,000 trees.
Remember Probost's Mechanical Christmas Crib (Nov-Dec 2019 Automata Magazine).  It is automata.  
And I think that Miniatur Wunderland is automata.  
And I wonder what automata will be like in another 100 years.

Anyway...thanks for reading.  Looking forward to your comments.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California



What 3D software do you use?

BANOFALK
 

Hello Jim and ALL

 

I use AutoCad. I have used it for the last 30 years, throughout my working life - so am pretty proficient at it. It is good for 2D drafting and for 3D models. When making automata, I usually prepare 2D plans which are printed off full scale for use as templates.

 

I managed to write some software for AutoCad (not AutoCad Light) which allows you to flick from one image to another, like a flick book, giving the impression of movement (both 2D and 3D):

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJKYblCxYPs&t

 

It takes about 20 hours to learn basic AutoCad. You can download an educational version for free:

 

https://www.autodesk.com/education/free-software/autocad

 

I have been told that it is possible to find unlicensed 34 bit copies – at your own risk!

 

Newer computers running 64 bit processors need enabling software (such as Longbow) to run the old 32 bit software.

 

Regards

 

Barry

 

 

What 3D software do you use?

 

A few years ago I was using SketchUp to do renderings for me.  I found it to be both easy and difficult.  And then one day I opened my eyes and realized that I had not used it for about a year.  I went back in...and when I went to upgrade I found it is now web based (not good...not bad...just different).
So, I've been thinking about what I really want to use 3D software for.  I can think of three reasons:
  1. To sketch random ideas and mechanisms.
  2. To perhaps feed a 3D printer one of these days.
  3. To watch things in motion.
I believe that SketchUp can do 1 & 2, but don't think it can do things in motion.

Any recommendations?  i'm 74, computer literate, and am looking for something that will be around for at least the next 20 years or so.
I want it to be my last 3D learning curve.

Thanks in advance.

Cheers
-Jim Coffee-

Re: Random motion

 

Hello again...
I find this interesting.  I'm guessing that this is not your first construction with cardboard. Tell us more.  Perhaps you have more images?  Any video.  I'm wondering to myself if cardboard would be a good medium for prototyping.  What part of the world are you in?  What are you interested in random motion and linkages?
I know...lot's of questions.  Sorry.  I'm simply interested...and that is what this forum is about.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-

On Fri, 10 Jan 2020 at 00:30, <catilaporte@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Thamks and yes! Cardboard ribbons, so i can make a bunch of gears not having to calculate anything !
Here is what i was looking at before discovering the  mechanism 125!
http://dynref.engr.illinois.edu/aml.html
(I still have to figure out a right way to constrain to vertical axe )

Re: Random motion

catilaporte@...
 
Edited

Thamks and yes! Cardboard ribbons, so i can make a bunch of gears not having to calculate anything !
Here is what i was looking at before discovering the  mechanism 125!
http://dynref.engr.illinois.edu/aml.html
(I still have to figure out a right way to constrain to vertical axe )

Re: Random motion

 

Greetings...
This is a wonderful little random unit.  Good job.  It looks like you made the gear teeth out of cardboard ribbons?
Thanks for sharing.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-

On Thu, 9 Jan 2020 at 13:27, <catilaporte@...> wrote:
Wow! I just spend the day  building it to test my gears, all made of cardboard , somewhat flimsy but working .
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10157935732058390&set=a.61241608389&type=3&theater
(I am in my week 4 in automata learning )

Re: Random motion

catilaporte@...
 

Wow! I just spend the day  building it to test my gears, all made of cardboard , somewhat flimsy but working .
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10157935732058390&set=a.61241608389&type=3&theater
(I am in my week 4 in automata learning )

What's On My Bench: Connecting the links

 

I'm in the process of connecting the cams to the parts of the automata that need motion.
I've been using  polyurethane belting for about four years now.  I've been using it only to "drive" things.   I source it from McMaster-Carr.  As a result of using it I've become more familiar with it.  It's flexible, tough, a tiny bit elastic  (negligible in short lengths).  One of the things that I've noticed is that I've never had a joint fail.  The tubing is cut, and then joined with a little aluminum fitting that has ridges on it.  I've never had one come apart.
So as I was creating linkages between cams and parts of the automata that I'm working on I realized that I could use this tubing as links.  A #4 screw screws into the hollow core of the tubing...and essentially won't come out.  I've got it in two colors...yellow (which I am using inside the drive frame), and clear (which I am using outside the drive frame).
I've attached a couple of images to show you how it works.  So far I'm pleased with how this is going.
I look forward to seeing what on your workbench.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California

IMG_20200108_195745-1000.jpg
IMG_20200108_195803-1000.jpg

Re: What's on my bench: Removable CamPak

Mike
 

Wonderful idea Jim. Depending on the design of the automata a removable campak could be swapped out with other campaks to provide a different effect. The writing automata come to mind.
--
Looking forward to hearing about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities

What's on my bench: Removable CamPak

 

Greetings all...
The automata that I am currently working on calls for 6 cams.  As I contemplated the build I realized that if I "built these things in" that it would be a difficult build...and that maintenance (should there be any) would be difficult.  So I decided that I wanted the campak to be easily removable.  For size reference...the cams are 5" diameter, 3/16 inch baltic birch ply.
The first image shows the campak installed...and the second image shows the campak removed.  Removal takes 1 minute at the most.
The cam followers will hang from the shaft that you see above the campak.
The next steps in this build will be to remove five of the six cams...and then create the follower and linkage and then cut the sixth cam.  When done with the 6th cam...repeat for the five remaining cams.
When completed it should all work.  I hope so...I've never done this before.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California

IMG_20200102_181505-1000.jpg
IMG_20200102_181348-1000.jpg

Re: Tiny Insect Contains the Only Mechanical Gears Ever Found in Nature

 

This is really interesting.
Wouldn't you love to own and know how to operate an electron microscope?
Cheers
-Jim-

On Thu, 2 Jan 2020 at 12:12, Randy <rglissmann@...> wrote:
I thought this was interesting. https://www.thevintagenews.com/2020/01/02/mechanical-insect/


-Randy

Tiny Insect Contains the Only Mechanical Gears Ever Found in Nature

Randy
 

Re: What's On My Bench - Colorado Christmas

Gus
 

Nice Mike,

One way to finance some new toys ........

Gus

Re: Happy New Year

Gus
 

All best to you too Mario, 
Gus