Date   
Re: 3D printing...some random thoughts

 

Thanks very much.
Both of these seem more user-friendly than the actual Fusion 360 tutorials.  I appreciate the links!
-Jim-

On Tue, 18 Feb 2020 at 07:40, <veeracer@...> wrote:
I would also recommend this guy for fusion 360 tutorials
https://www.youtube.com/user/cadcamstuff

Re: 3D printing...some random thoughts

veeracer@...
 

I would also recommend this guy for fusion 360 tutorials
https://www.youtube.com/user/cadcamstuff

Re: 3D printing...some random thoughts

 

Thanks Randy...
YouTube tutorials can be wonderful.  Appreciate the recommendation.
-Jim-

On Tue, 18 Feb 2020 at 05:56, Randy <rglissmann@...> wrote:
Jim,
There are a lot of Youtube tutorials around on learning Fusion 360. It's a unbelievably powerful tool and has been the best investment of time that I've made into a software package. I recommend watching Kevin at https://www.youtube.com/user/TheKHaug/videos. He does a great job with beginners and I still go back and watch a few of them to brush up on some techniques.

-Randy

Re: 3D printing...some random thoughts

Randy
 

Jim,
There are a lot of Youtube tutorials around on learning Fusion 360. It's a unbelievably powerful tool and has been the best investment of time that I've made into a software package. I recommend watching Kevin at https://www.youtube.com/user/TheKHaug/videos. He does a great job with beginners and I still go back and watch a few of them to brush up on some techniques.

-Randy

What's on my workbench: Cams and Bells

 

Greetings...
I've been slowly working through things to get The Electric Chair completed.   It's slow...and it's hard to show the progress in such a manner that I think is interesting.  That said...to not show progress is probably less interesting...so here goes.
IMG_20200216_173548-1000.jpg
This image shows the completed campak.  This campak includes six cams and a pulley.  I can easily remove the intact campak from the machine in less than a minute.  The cams have been cut based on time.  I have a storyboard that includes timing...and I cut the cams per the storyboard.  The sixth cam includes a small ramp that operates a microswitch that is used to tell the electrics package when one complete automata sequence has been completed.  The cams are cut from 3/16" Baltic Birch plywood and are followed by 1/2" diameter ball bearings.

IMG_20200217_175718-1000.jpg
This image shows the bell.  This little bell has been a real bugger to get right.  You are looking at about the 4th design...and the third type of bell.  The function of this bell is to simulate a telephone ringing near the end of the automata sequence.  I hate to admit that I've spent about a week on this little detail.  The good news is that I now have more dinging experience under my belt...so that the next time I work with bells it will be less like bell hell.

At the present time, I am working on the electrics portion of this automata.  The electrics package will include the motor, main power cord, a 3 amp circuit breaker, a DPDT toggle, a momentary push button, and connectors.  When completed the electrics package will be easily installed as one unit into the automata.  The package will include everything except one microswitch which is located at the other end of the automata.  When doing the wiring I'm trying to be careful to do a good job...and to create in such a manner that it will be hard to get into accidental contact with any of the electric voltage.  This automata will have three modes of operation: 1) Hand crank. 2) Push the red button and one automata cycle will perform under electric power. 3) Continuous operation under electric power.

I began creating this automata at the end of October 2019.  It's been going slower than I would like...but that's the nature of the beast.  When I am done with this phase I will have created a "machine".  The next step in the process will be to disassemble everything.  Paint. Reassemble.  Add other detail.  In the end, it will not be a machine...it will be a short story.

I enjoy this "What's on your workbench" section of the forum and encourage all of you that are creating automata to show what is going on.  We have a lot that we can learn from each other...and much to share with those that are not creating automata.

Cheers from
Jim in San Diego

Re: 3D printing...some random thoughts

 

Hi Randy...
I'm moving slowly ahead.  Thanks for the Fusion 360 recommendation.  I've downloaded it and am now working through the tutorials.  Yes...it is certainly industrial-strength.  I'm looking long term...so an investment of my time into this software seems reasonable.
I'm also working with TinkerCad and believe that I will put some effort into Blender.
Investing in a 3D printer is a big step for me because it is much more than a 3D printer...it is a whole world that includes software (and related learning curves) and filament (and related learning curves), not to mention the machine and it's learning curves.  I can see how it would be easy to want to do everything with the 3D printer.  I don't want to do everything because I enjoy working with my tools and different materials...but I can see that a 3D printer will give me capabilities that I do not presently have...and I find that exciting.  And I also find it exciting that I will be able to do things that I presently cannot envision.  As I learn the tools other opportunities will come into focus.
Cheers
-Jim-



On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 at 15:39, Randy <rglissmann@...> wrote:
As an old (67) woodworker I had some initial reservations about both CNC and 3D printing. I have great respect for the craftsmen that can create wood objects that I don't have the talent nor patience to make. Also being an engineer, I'm intrigued by technology and  while some may consider it a shortcut, these TOOLs allow me to create things, very challenging things, that I would probably give up on. Anyway, I got tired of wood dust and totally transitioned to 3D printing. I'm willing to accept the scorn of the purests, but for most people, they just appreciate the creative effort in my designs. I airbrush my work so the material, plastic vs. wood, is immaterial. To reiterate, I'm in awe of someone who can create a 40 tooth gear by hand.

There are two main types of 3D printers: cartesian and delta. A cartesian printer moves the base in the X and Y directions create the object. The plastic extruder moves up in the Z direction as layers of plastic are layer on. A delta printer has a fixed base and the extruder dances around in the X, Y, and Z directions. I've never seen a delta and that may be because they are definitely less popular than cartesian. I'm not saying they are inferior, but I do think that both the manufacturer and community support is less than cartesian. I own an Ender 3 cartesian printer. It is a simple $200 printer that works very well. I have added a few well documented tune-ups that makes it very reliable. I can discuss these if there is interest.

Regarding filaments, I've tried different types of plastic but have always return to PLA, the most commonly used printing material. For a stationary object without environmental temperature and humidity stress, it works just fine. I use Hatchbox white PLA. I have found that the manufacturer of the filament does make a difference. For design software, I use Fusion 360. This software is SO amazing. For a hobbyist, using it is free. This is industrial-strength software, so don't expect to be productive overnight. 

Re: 3D printing...some random thoughts

Randy
 

Resin prints are good for high detail. I made a rack several years ago with very small teeth and it came out great. The cost, messiness, and environmental issues with the resin keep me from considering purchasing a printer. My local library has one if I should ever need to print something.

I airbrush with DecoArt Americana acrylic, commonly used by artists. I dilute it 50% to make it sprayable. I initially thought I would need to use a primer but the PLA print surface is abrasive enough to allow the paint to "grab" on. I usually apply two coats. The available PLA colors are limited so being able to paint over white PLA gives me unlimited flexibility on selecting colors. I apply a protective coat of Deft clear satin lacquer to seal the print.

Re: 3D printing...some random thoughts

 

Hi Randy...
Thanks for your response.
I'm impressed that you've transitioned all the way.  Gives me further confidence in the 3D printing technology.
Neither you nor I have mentioned the resin printers.  I think that they need more time to mature.  Interesting concept though.
Regarding painting...you say that you airbrush.  What primer do you use?  You are priming plastics.
Thanks
-Jim-

On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 at 15:39, Randy <rglissmann@...> wrote:
As an old (67) woodworker I had some initial reservations about both CNC and 3D printing. I have great respect for the craftsmen that can create wood objects that I don't have the talent nor patience to make. Also being an engineer, I'm intrigued by technology and  while some may consider it a shortcut, these TOOLs allow me to create things, very challenging things, that I would probably give up on. Anyway, I got tired of wood dust and totally transitioned to 3D printing. I'm willing to accept the scorn of the purests, but for most people, they just appreciate the creative effort in my designs. I airbrush my work so the material, plastic vs. wood, is immaterial. To reiterate, I'm in awe of someone who can create a 40 tooth gear by hand.

There are two main types of 3D printers: cartesian and delta. A cartesian printer moves the base in the X and Y directions create the object. The plastic extruder moves up in the Z direction as layers of plastic are layer on. A delta printer has a fixed base and the extruder dances around in the X, Y, and Z directions. I've never seen a delta and that may be because they are definitely less popular than cartesian. I'm not saying they are inferior, but I do think that both the manufacturer and community support is less than cartesian. I own an Ender 3 cartesian printer. It is a simple $200 printer that works very well. I have added a few well documented tune-ups that makes it very reliable. I can discuss these if there is interest.

Regarding filaments, I've tried different types of plastic but have always return to PLA, the most commonly used printing material. For a stationary object without environmental temperature and humidity stress, it works just fine. I use Hatchbox white PLA. I have found that the manufacturer of the filament does make a difference. For design software, I use Fusion 360. This software is SO amazing. For a hobbyist, using it is free. This is industrial-strength software, so don't expect to be productive overnight. 

Re: 3D printing...some random thoughts

Randy
 

As an old (67) woodworker I had some initial reservations about both CNC and 3D printing. I have great respect for the craftsmen that can create wood objects that I don't have the talent nor patience to make. Also being an engineer, I'm intrigued by technology and  while some may consider it a shortcut, these TOOLs allow me to create things, very challenging things, that I would probably give up on. Anyway, I got tired of wood dust and totally transitioned to 3D printing. I'm willing to accept the scorn of the purests, but for most people, they just appreciate the creative effort in my designs. I airbrush my work so the material, plastic vs. wood, is immaterial. To reiterate, I'm in awe of someone who can create a 40 tooth gear by hand.

There are two main types of 3D printers: cartesian and delta. A cartesian printer moves the base in the X and Y directions create the object. The plastic extruder moves up in the Z direction as layers of plastic are layer on. A delta printer has a fixed base and the extruder dances around in the X, Y, and Z directions. I've never seen a delta and that may be because they are definitely less popular than cartesian. I'm not saying they are inferior, but I do think that both the manufacturer and community support is less than cartesian. I own an Ender 3 cartesian printer. It is a simple $200 printer that works very well. I have added a few well documented tune-ups that makes it very reliable. I can discuss these if there is interest.

Regarding filaments, I've tried different types of plastic but have always return to PLA, the most commonly used printing material. For a stationary object without environmental temperature and humidity stress, it works just fine. I use Hatchbox white PLA. I have found that the manufacturer of the filament does make a difference. For design software, I use Fusion 360. This software is SO amazing. For a hobbyist, using it is free. This is industrial-strength software, so don't expect to be productive overnight. 

Re: 3D printing...some random thoughts

Automata Magazine
 

I think an automaton is defined by what it is, not how it’s made. People may have opinions — sometimes strong ones — concerning which materials and processes are “permissible,” but in the end it’s up to the individual to make his/her own choices. This is art, after all. —Marc


On Feb 10, 2020, at 9:58 AM, Jim Coffee <jim@...> wrote:

Greetings...
As I mentioned in a prior post I'm exploring the purchase of a 3D printer.  Here are some of my random thoughts.
Is 3D printing "legal" in the automata world?
I've sort of worried about this.  In the end, I conclude that if this technology had been available in past centuries that it would have been used to create automata (or anything else).  But I also think that there is an art to keeping the 'old character' of automata.  Not saying that automata needs to look old because I don't think it does need to look old.  But I do think that there is an art to how automata is created and how it looks.  Each of us has h/her own artistic values.  
For example, I am in the process right now of completing an automata machine.  The next step in my process is to convert this machine to a story.  To me, it is the story that is important.
At the end of the day, I think that there is room to "either use 3D printers or not".

What will I do with a 3D printer?
As I contemplate the purchase of a 3D printer I am trying to real-world think about what I would use it for.  Here is a short list:
  • Gears and pulleys
  • Spacers
  • Mounting plates
  • Frames
  • Bipeds (this is a big concern of mine)
  • Marble track (runs)
  • Pedestals
  • Fancy things that would be hard to create from something else.
  • etc.
There are many more things that I am considering.  Bottom line...I feel that I have enough justification to purchase the 3D printer and to climb the relevant learning curves.

Which 3D printer am I considering?
We live in an interesting day and age.  Before we make important purchases we are easily able to investigate and compare thoughts and experiences from around the world.
There are some important printer features that should be acquired:
  • Extruder heating temp of 260-270 C.  If you don't have high enough temperature there are certain filaments that you will not be able to use.
  • Bed temp of 100 C or so.
  • Manufacturing volume, larger is better than smaller.
  • Footprint.
  • Forum and support.
  • Company credibility.
  • Reviews.
At this time the machine that I am most favoring is the FLSUN QQ S Pro.  This is a delta style printer.  It will cost in the neighborhood of $300.

More important than the machine is the filament:
It has been interesting looking into the filaments.  A lot has changed in the few years since I last investigated.  Bottom line...I believe that the filament materials available today are very capable of printing those things that I will be creating.  And the frosting on the cake is that the filaments will continue to become more capable.  At this time I am focused on the PETG filament.  After I learn to print with PETG I will want to learn nylon.

I am pleased to see that there are also filaments that are composed of wood, copper, brass, bronze, aluminum, steel.  Of these, I would like to learn wood, copper, and bronze.  I'm wondering how strong they are.  And I am hoping that I'll be able to patina the copper.

It's Plastic!
I know.  Part of me is repulsed by plastic (I'm an old guy) but another part of me is intrigued by plastic.  It is true that our human society has not learned how to properly integrate plastic into our environment...but it is also true there is progress being made.  In 100 years we will probably be using very different materials and those materials will be more successfully integrated.  We are learning to live with plastic...just as we have had to learn to live with different races, with lead, with petroleum, with a lack of knowledge.  You get the point..things evolve.

The Software
To 3D print there are two software steps.  First you must create or download a 3D model.  And then secondly you must slice the 3D model into layers that are sent to the printer.
After I made my list of what I would use the 3D printer for I decided to try to create the parts in software.  Thus far I'm happy with eMachineShop.  I've been able to create parts and it's been a pleasant learning experience.  Is this the software that I'll be using in two years...I don't know.  For now, it's fine.
For slicing I've focused on Cura...which seems to be an industry standard.  It's very capable and it is free.  One of the fun things is that it will tell you how long it will take to print the part.  For example...one of the little pulleys that I created will take 3.5 hours to print.  It also tells how many meters of filament will be used.

The Story is what is important
At the end of the automata road, it is the story that is important.  We all tell the story our own way.  That is one of the things that makes the world of automata so interesting...we tell our stories differently from each other.  There is no firm recipe for automata.  Automata is an art form.

To be continued...
I'm not ready to purchase this month.  I've got more to research and more to become aware of.  I'll most likely purchase in March.  After a bit of time I'll post the next chapter of my 3D printing experience.

Sorry this post has been so long...I'm hoping that someone will find value.

Cheers from San Diego
-Jim Coffee-


3D printing...some random thoughts

 

Greetings...
As I mentioned in a prior post I'm exploring the purchase of a 3D printer.  Here are some of my random thoughts.
Is 3D printing "legal" in the automata world?
I've sort of worried about this.  In the end, I conclude that if this technology had been available in past centuries that it would have been used to create automata (or anything else).  But I also think that there is an art to keeping the 'old character' of automata.  Not saying that automata needs to look old because I don't think it does need to look old.  But I do think that there is an art to how automata is created and how it looks.  Each of us has h/her own artistic values.  
For example, I am in the process right now of completing an automata machine.  The next step in my process is to convert this machine to a story.  To me, it is the story that is important.
At the end of the day, I think that there is room to "either use 3D printers or not".

What will I do with a 3D printer?
As I contemplate the purchase of a 3D printer I am trying to real-world think about what I would use it for.  Here is a short list:
  • Gears and pulleys
  • Spacers
  • Mounting plates
  • Frames
  • Bipeds (this is a big concern of mine)
  • Marble track (runs)
  • Pedestals
  • Fancy things that would be hard to create from something else.
  • etc.
There are many more things that I am considering.  Bottom line...I feel that I have enough justification to purchase the 3D printer and to climb the relevant learning curves.

Which 3D printer am I considering?
We live in an interesting day and age.  Before we make important purchases we are easily able to investigate and compare thoughts and experiences from around the world.
There are some important printer features that should be acquired:
  • Extruder heating temp of 260-270 C.  If you don't have high enough temperature there are certain filaments that you will not be able to use.
  • Bed temp of 100 C or so.
  • Manufacturing volume, larger is better than smaller.
  • Footprint.
  • Forum and support.
  • Company credibility.
  • Reviews.
At this time the machine that I am most favoring is the FLSUN QQ S Pro.  This is a delta style printer.  It will cost in the neighborhood of $300.

More important than the machine is the filament:
It has been interesting looking into the filaments.  A lot has changed in the few years since I last investigated.  Bottom line...I believe that the filament materials available today are very capable of printing those things that I will be creating.  And the frosting on the cake is that the filaments will continue to become more capable.  At this time I am focused on the PETG filament.  After I learn to print with PETG I will want to learn nylon.

I am pleased to see that there are also filaments that are composed of wood, copper, brass, bronze, aluminum, steel.  Of these, I would like to learn wood, copper, and bronze.  I'm wondering how strong they are.  And I am hoping that I'll be able to patina the copper.

It's Plastic!
I know.  Part of me is repulsed by plastic (I'm an old guy) but another part of me is intrigued by plastic.  It is true that our human society has not learned how to properly integrate plastic into our environment...but it is also true there is progress being made.  In 100 years we will probably be using very different materials and those materials will be more successfully integrated.  We are learning to live with plastic...just as we have had to learn to live with different races, with lead, with petroleum, with a lack of knowledge.  You get the point..things evolve.

The Software
To 3D print there are two software steps.  First you must create or download a 3D model.  And then secondly you must slice the 3D model into layers that are sent to the printer.
After I made my list of what I would use the 3D printer for I decided to try to create the parts in software.  Thus far I'm happy with eMachineShop.  I've been able to create parts and it's been a pleasant learning experience.  Is this the software that I'll be using in two years...I don't know.  For now, it's fine.
For slicing I've focused on Cura...which seems to be an industry standard.  It's very capable and it is free.  One of the fun things is that it will tell you how long it will take to print the part.  For example...one of the little pulleys that I created will take 3.5 hours to print.  It also tells how many meters of filament will be used.

The Story is what is important
At the end of the automata road, it is the story that is important.  We all tell the story our own way.  That is one of the things that makes the world of automata so interesting...we tell our stories differently from each other.  There is no firm recipe for automata.  Automata is an art form.

To be continued...
I'm not ready to purchase this month.  I've got more to research and more to become aware of.  I'll most likely purchase in March.  After a bit of time I'll post the next chapter of my 3D printing experience.

Sorry this post has been so long...I'm hoping that someone will find value.

Cheers from San Diego
-Jim Coffee-

Re: My trip to the Miniature Show

Randy
 

Make sure you have a working knife switch. That will be cool. Maybe a power meter too.
Frankenstein.JPG

On Tue, Feb 4, 2020 at 8:26 PM Jim Coffee <jim@...> wrote:
I am in the process of creating an automata called 'The Electric Chair'.  It is what it sounds like.  One of the issues that I've been wanting to deal with is the clothing for both the convict and the guard.  I've poked around on-line and not been able to find anything suitable. I've considered creating the clothing myself (I'm a 74 year old male).  And then spotted an ad for a Miniature Show that was nearby.  I attended last weekend.  I was pleasantly surprised by what I found
  • Almost immediately I found a woman who lives here in the San Diego area who would be willing to create the clothing for both the convict and the guard.  She estimated about $30.00 each.  She noted that neither one would need underwear.  She estimated between 2 and 8 weeks.  She is older than me...bent over further than I am...very nice...and accepting of the subject matter.  I am  very pleased to have met her and will be mailing my bipeds to her within the month.
There were other things there:
  • Just generally speaking...walking around...seeing the doll houses...seeing all the displays...was lubricating to my creative juices.  I'm glad I went.
  • One lady had little fruits and vegetables.  They were so realistic that when cut open with a razor blade you could see that the interiors looked anatomically correct as well as the exteriors.  Bizarre.
  • Other booths displayed plates with food (meals) on them.  Some booths had tables that were set with plates of food.  This got me to thinking about my convict's last meal.  I think it would be kind of neat to have a mostly consumed 'last meal' in the background.  Unfortunately the foods were too small for my automata...but the idea sticks...and I will look for larger food.
  • Rugs.  There were extremely realistic looking rugs of all (small) sizes.
  • Bamboo window blinds caught my eye.
  • Architecturally correct building parts...wood framed windows...wood framed doors...were interesting to see.
  • All kinds of small led lighting devices.
  • Decorated doll houses in many different themes...from residential thru shops thru stores.  No motion (read no automata).
  • There were few people there under 30.  Of those there most were women...with an average age of perhaps 47.
  • It appeared that most of the products for sale were items that had been sourced from somewhere else.  
A major take away for me was that 'details matter'.  My automata tend to be machines.  I need to correct that...I need to make them appear to be more like 'real life'.  I need to add more relevant detail to my automata.

Anyway...the show was interesting...I'm glad that I went.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
San Diego, CA.

My trip to the Miniature Show

 

I am in the process of creating an automata called 'The Electric Chair'.  It is what it sounds like.  One of the issues that I've been wanting to deal with is the clothing for both the convict and the guard.  I've poked around on-line and not been able to find anything suitable. I've considered creating the clothing myself (I'm a 74 year old male).  And then spotted an ad for a Miniature Show that was nearby.  I attended last weekend.  I was pleasantly surprised by what I found
  • Almost immediately I found a woman who lives here in the San Diego area who would be willing to create the clothing for both the convict and the guard.  She estimated about $30.00 each.  She noted that neither one would need underwear.  She estimated between 2 and 8 weeks.  She is older than me...bent over further than I am...very nice...and accepting of the subject matter.  I am  very pleased to have met her and will be mailing my bipeds to her within the month.
There were other things there:
  • Just generally speaking...walking around...seeing the doll houses...seeing all the displays...was lubricating to my creative juices.  I'm glad I went.
  • One lady had little fruits and vegetables.  They were so realistic that when cut open with a razor blade you could see that the interiors looked anatomically correct as well as the exteriors.  Bizarre.
  • Other booths displayed plates with food (meals) on them.  Some booths had tables that were set with plates of food.  This got me to thinking about my convict's last meal.  I think it would be kind of neat to have a mostly consumed 'last meal' in the background.  Unfortunately the foods were too small for my automata...but the idea sticks...and I will look for larger food.
  • Rugs.  There were extremely realistic looking rugs of all (small) sizes.
  • Bamboo window blinds caught my eye.
  • Architecturally correct building parts...wood framed windows...wood framed doors...were interesting to see.
  • All kinds of small led lighting devices.
  • Decorated doll houses in many different themes...from residential thru shops thru stores.  No motion (read no automata).
  • There were few people there under 30.  Of those there most were women...with an average age of perhaps 47.
  • It appeared that most of the products for sale were items that had been sourced from somewhere else.  
A major take away for me was that 'details matter'.  My automata tend to be machines.  I need to correct that...I need to make them appear to be more like 'real life'.  I need to add more relevant detail to my automata.

Anyway...the show was interesting...I'm glad that I went.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
San Diego, CA.

3D Printer

 

I value this forum.  Some of the posts so far have been from automatists that use 3D printers.  I had been on the path of purchasing a mini lathe and a mill.  After reading the 3D printer posts and after rethinking what I was really try to accomplish I've started down the path of learning about 3D printers.
So far what I am finding is that there are many printers available...at many price points.  Filament seems to be the most important aspect of 3D printing so I am on that path right now...learning about the filaments that are available.
Thanks to those of you that have posted about 3D printers.
Cheers
-Jim-

What's on my bench: French Curves

 

Greetings...My current project is The Electric Chair.  Slow progress.  Lots of little details.  This build includes what I call the Drive Frame.  The drive frame sits below the automata and powers the automata.  Critical parts of the drive frame are the two side frames.  It is into the two side frames that the axles and shafts and cams and belts and the motor and hand crank sit.  When I began creating this automata I made a best guess at what these two side frames would look like.  Now as I'm coming into the final stages of powering all of the motions it is time to cut the final (I hope) side frames.
You will note that I use a french curve.  I could use straight lines but prefer not to.  My objective is to have the side frames be sturdy enough to contain everything, and to be a lattice so that folks can see into and past them to the drive components.  The material is 1/4" Baltic Birch plywood.
And just a side note...these frames are cut-out on a scroll saw.  Lines made with a french curve are hard (for me) to cut.  Unlike a straight line or a circle, a line made with a french curve is constantly changing.  I put on my magnifiers, turn off my audio book, and settle in for a slow scroll.
IMG_20200124_093244-1000.jpg
I look forward to seeing what is on your workbench.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
San Diego, CA

 

Re: What's On My Bench - The Guards of Medusa

veeracer@...
 

Well Done !!!
I need to step my game up with my 3D printer.

BillB

Re: Metal Lathe, do you machine wood

Automata Magazine
 

1 & 2. I have two lathes -- a Taig 3” lathe and a 9” South Bend made in the 1950s, which is my favorite tool in my shop. I love it and couldn’t do what I want to do without it. The Taig is also an excellent precision machine, but good mostly for small parts. You can make small parts on a big lathe but you can’t make big parts on a little one.

3. I prefer to work with brass or free-machining steel. Aluminum machines well but I don’t like the material.

4. I have machined wood but don’t like to on my lathes for the reasons Vance outlined. I ALWAYS use a vacuum in close proximity to the cutting tool when machining wood, and thoroughly clean up afterward. If it’s a larger part, I’ll put some protective plastic over parts of the lathe.

5. I also have two milling machines -- a Taig, which is excellent for most things that I do, and a Rusnok for larger or heavier work.

—Marc

On Jan 18, 2020, at 8:34 PM, Jim Coffee <jim@...> wrote:

Greetings...
It would be interesting to know which of you own a metal lathe.  If so my questions would be...
  1. Do you appreciate owning it?  Practically speaking...does it help you?
  2. What size/brand is it?
  3. Do you have a 'favorite metal' that you like to work with?
  4. Do you also machine wood?
  5. Do you also own a milling machine?
Thanks in advance.
-Jim Coffee-


Re: Metal Lathe, do you machine wood

V Bass
 

1. Metal lathes are incredibly useful for the tasks for which they're designed. There are some turning jobs you could do with, say, a drill press, but for precision, consistency and ease of production, nothing can beat one.

2. I own a Harbor Freight 7x10 lathe. It's  plenty for the kinds of small hobby projects I do. I have changed the handwheels to a set from MicroMark, which have accurate .001 inch markings, which the originals did not. Before, I had a Taig Micro Lathe, which is a simple, inexpensive machine that will do small jobs well. It's not much on material much over 1 inch diameter, however.

3. I prefer to work in brass. It's weighty and substantial, which is a plus in the kinds of projects I do, and it's very easy to machine.

4. I have not machined wood, and it's not advised for metal lathes because the sawdust gets into crevices and the wood chemicals can corrode precision surfaces. That said, I know that there people do use them for wood, presumably with a good vacuum attachment and fastidious cleaning.

5. I had a milling machine before we downsized. Like the lathe, it's a wonderful tool to have when you need to do what mills do. I paid for mine about a week after I got it, by reproducing a part that broke on our home heating furnace. The unit was old enough that we would have had to replace the whole thing, at a cost of probably 5 times what I paid for the mill. That convinced everyone in the house that it was a good purchase.

Metal Lathe, do you machine wood

 

Greetings...
It would be interesting to know which of you own a metal lathe.  If so my questions would be...
  1. Do you appreciate owning it?  Practically speaking...does it help you?
  2. What size/brand is it?
  3. Do you have a 'favorite metal' that you like to work with?
  4. Do you also machine wood?
  5. Do you also own a milling machine?
Thanks in advance.
-Jim Coffee-

Re: What's On My Bench - The Guards of Medusa

Mario Núñez
 

Nice work!

Mario