Date   

Congrats...the magazine continues

 

Greetings...
Nice email from Marc this morning...Automata Magazine lives on!
Thanks to those that stepped up to assist.
Personally, I'm glad.  The magazine enriches my life.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-


Re: mm vs inches

federico
 
Edited

Hey Jim! 

I've been thinking about this for a while. I grew up using metric (in South America) but I moved to the U.S almost 20 years ago
and here I've worked a lot in construction and fabrication related fields, and oh boy, was it a rough transition at the beginning. 
I remember buying measuring tapes that included metric and imperial and I even carried a calculator that could do fractions and 
conversions easily into job sites. But the inevitable happened and I just got used to thinking in feet and inches and fractions of
inches, and you know, I actually find it quite intuitive by now if the size of your project easily relates to a human body. 

I think the number 12 (inches in a foot) is so nice to work with. It divides easily by 2, 3, 4, and 6. And dividing an inch into fractions
for objects nearly the size of a hand now makes sense to me. I just wish there were more things with base 12. 

At this point it's easier for me to have a mental image of what's a foot, or 10 feet, or a mile  than it is to have a mental image
of a centimeter, a meter of a kilometer. I think that kind of matters since real world references inform my understanding of things.

That said, there are some instances where metric does make more sense. 3D printing is certainly one of those, most of the software
I've been using has less issues when using metric as a rule. For example, I was designing things in fusion360 using inches, then
I would export a file into the slicer and the dimensions where all wrong, so it was simpler just to work in mm across the board 
rather than mess around with conversions. That's why I think your decision to create the 3D printing files using metric is very wise. 

That said, at this point I kind of consider myself "bilingual" when it comes to measuring systems. I certainly have wished that everyone
adopted the metric system and standards, but I also think it's fine to speak multiple languages (disclaimer, my native language is 
Spanish so there is some background there). And there are some things about using inches and feet that I actually enjoy. 

Then there is the issue of fasteners, I also have a collection of #2, #4, #6, #8, #10 and 1/4" and sometimes I've thought about 
switching over to metric but the prices in the US are often almost double for metric, so I tend to stick with what I have. 

To end with some practical suggestions I'd say:
  • definitely have a metric ruler for at hand when you are designing, for reference.
  • SometimesI also sketch on 5mm grid paper (the common grid paper in the us is 1/4"), I feel that "forces" some of the design decisions into a metric reference.
  • Digital calipers are wonderful for going back and forth between metric and imperial, or if you are staying in metric they still make life easier. 
  • Make reference your own materials like the hole plank below.

I like to make a hole reference print that I keep on my desk. It's just a plank with labeled holes in a certain range.
The one in the picture goes between 2.0mm and 4.9mm in increments of 0.1 mm. This is useful because sometimes I just want to know what
a whole of certain size looks like, or what hole has the right dimensions for a certain fastener or axle. It's also useful because the 3D printer is a bit 
more fuzzy when it comes to getting the dimensions you want, things will change depending on calibration, material choice, location of the feature, etc.
But this kind of reference made on your own printer can give you a pretty decent idea of what you need. 

Hope some of this is helpful or interesting, Cheers! :)

Federico 

 


mm vs inches

 

  • I'm 75.  When in 3rd grade they told us that they were going to teach us metric because the country was converting to metric.  They never did.  It never did.
  • So I slipped through life using inches...ignorant of metric.
  • In 2016 I built a street organ.  I ordered the plans from London, England.  The plans came hand-drawn and with a combination of inches and metric.  This was my metric baptism.
  • It's now 2020.  I have a 3D printer on order and am trying to slip into that (metric) world.
I'm posting this thread to perhaps start a discussion about metric vs inches.  I know that those of you not in the US most likely use metric (and are therefore fortunate).  I'm finding myself in the position of needing to convert my thinking into metric.  At first I thought I was too old to change horses...but the metric world is becoming more dominant and I'm needing to accept reality.  I've got some tools already that include both inches and metric.  A digital micrometer, for example.  And many of my rulers have both graduations.  And I DO like metric.  Once you get used to it, it's easier.
So I've decided to create all of my 3D print files using the metric system.  And I do have some supplies that are inches (ball bearing assemblies and stainless steel shafting, for example) that I will need to consume and then replace with metric.  I've got many pounds of fasteners #2, #4, #6, and #8.  I'm probably going to continue using the inch fasteners.
Anyway, curious to know if there are others out there that are considering making this change to metric?
Cheers
-Jm Coffee-


Re: What's on my bench: A completed Bottle Spinner

 

Good morning Gus...
Your timing is good.  I just uploaded the videos.
Regarding the ratchets specifically...you can see them in this video beginning at about 3:00 minutes.  If you watch long enough you will see the normal speed turn to slow motion (4X).  In slow motion it's easier to see the little ratchets working.  And in case it's not clear, there is chain attached to the levers that the biped is stepping on.  The upper end of the chains are attached to the ratchet body's (and cause the body to rotate, and thus the pawls engage and covert motion to rotary).
I hope all is well with you.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California



On Tue, 29 Sep 2020 at 22:53, Gus <klekner@...> wrote:
Hi Jim,
Hard to imagine how it works,  the bottle spins, what purpose do the ratchets serve ? The video will clarify, I'm sure
Good luck with the marketing. hopefully leading to rentals.
Cheers,
Gus

Keep Safe


What's on my Bench: Video Production

 

Greetings from San Diego...
Well, I've created three new videos.
  • To capture the video I use my Pixel 2 XL
  • I also use the Pixel 2 XL for the sound capture.
  • I have two tripods, a floor standing model and a desktop model (that I designed).
  • I use a window blind that pulls down the backside of my workbench to provide a backdrop.
  • I use natural light from the open garage door, and a studio light.
  • Kdenlive is the video editor.
  • YouTube is the movie theater.
  • I have a difficult time managing the blue jays (keeping them quiet).  And a neighbor was cutting stepping stones for what seemed like years...I had to work around that noise.
  • The LED shop lighting that I have causes my videos to become 'banded' sometimes.  It's frustrating.
I find creating these videos to be stressful, and I am never satisfied.  That said...at least I'm trying...and learning to do better.  I believe that video is an important part of the total picture.

Enjoy.

With best regards

    -Jim-
James Coffee Studios
jim@...
JamesCoffeeStudios.com
870 Gretna Green Way
Escondido, CA  92025
985-247-9779

..."a Democracy is not a spectator sport"






Re: What's on my bench: A completed Bottle Spinner

Gus
 

Hi Jim,
Hard to imagine how it works,  the bottle spins, what purpose do the ratchets serve ? The video will clarify, I'm sure
Good luck with the marketing. hopefully leading to rentals.
Cheers,
Gus

Keep Safe


Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

Automata Magazine
 

Hi Jurgen,

Thanks very much for your supportive note and kind sentiments. I sincerely appreciate you writing. I have hopes of someone coming forward to take up the reins, so stay tuned. We’ll see what happens.

All best wishes,
Marc


On Sep 19, 2020, at 12:27 PM, Jurgen Bullaert <bullaert@...> wrote:

Hello Marc, 

Many thanks for all the time and effort you spend on making the automata magazine. For me, a newbie on building automata, it was a great source on the techniques Of making an automata. I wish you all the best and i hope you will fully recover from your back injuries. 

Met vriendelijke groet,

Jurgen Bullaert

Op 19 sep. 2020 om 16:59 heeft Automata Magazine <automatamag@...> het volgende geschreven:

Hi Bill,

Thanks very much for your supportive note and kind sentiments. I sincerely appreciate you writing. I have hopes of someone coming forward to take up the reins, so stay tuned. We’ll see what happens.

All best wishes,
Marc


On Sep 17, 2020, at 7:12 AM, veeracer@... wrote:

I would also like to jump in and say what an asset this magazine has been to me and do hope it will somehow carry on, but taking care of yourself is job number one and I am wishing you the best for a speedy and painless recovery !

BillB



Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

Jurgen Bullaert
 

Hello Marc, 

Many thanks for all the time and effort you spend on making the automata magazine. For me, a newbie on building automata, it was a great source on the techniques Of making an automata. I wish you all the best and i hope you will fully recover from your back injuries. 

Met vriendelijke groet,

Jurgen Bullaert

Op 19 sep. 2020 om 16:59 heeft Automata Magazine <automatamag@...> het volgende geschreven:

Hi Bill,

Thanks very much for your supportive note and kind sentiments. I sincerely appreciate you writing. I have hopes of someone coming forward to take up the reins, so stay tuned. We’ll see what happens.

All best wishes,
Marc


On Sep 17, 2020, at 7:12 AM, veeracer@... wrote:

I would also like to jump in and say what an asset this magazine has been to me and do hope it will somehow carry on, but taking care of yourself is job number one and I am wishing you the best for a speedy and painless recovery !

BillB


Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

Automata Magazine
 

Hi Bill,

Thanks very much for your supportive note and kind sentiments. I sincerely appreciate you writing. I have hopes of someone coming forward to take up the reins, so stay tuned. We’ll see what happens.

All best wishes,
Marc


On Sep 17, 2020, at 7:12 AM, veeracer@... wrote:

I would also like to jump in and say what an asset this magazine has been to me and do hope it will somehow carry on, but taking care of yourself is job number one and I am wishing you the best for a speedy and painless recovery !

BillB


Re: Check In

BiLL B
 

Still kicking here, but life is far from normal right now. Surprisingly covid is the least of the problems.

BillB


Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

BiLL B
 

I would also like to jump in and say what an asset this magazine has been to me and do hope it will somehow carry on, but taking care of yourself is job number one and I am wishing you the best for a speedy and painless recovery !

BillB


Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

Automata Magazine
 

Hi Ron. Many thanks for your kind words — much appreciated.  Best wishes, Marc


On Sep 15, 2020, at 8:10 PM, Ron K via groups.io <peter.pilot@...> wrote:

Hard to write with out simply repeating what others have said. But I do wish you a very speedy recovery. A public thanks for tracking down my misplaced Tinplate Girl purchase. Just another example of what a fine generous person Marc is to run that down for me out of simple kindness. Yes, the magazine will truly be missed. But not as much as the joy you shared with us.

Ron


What's on my bench: A completed Bottle Spinner

 

These past couple of weeks has gone by quickly.  Painting takes focus, and then there is the drying time, which is both important and frustrating.

After I reassembled, the drive mechanism proved unreliable.  The drive belt was storing energy and releasing it when one of the couplings passed around one of the pulleys.  I have replaced the drive belt with a plastic drive chain and all is well.  I’ve not used a plastic drive chain in this kind of situation but I think that it will be fine…the chain will be doing very little work…just a tiny amount.

As I’ve been creating this automata  I have on order a Prusa Mini 3D printer.  It will arrive here in the first couple of weeks of October.  So I’ve been looking at what I’m doing and what I need in anticipation of being able to create some of the components with the 3D printer.

I’ve concluded that I’ll be able to build to tighter tolerances with the 3D printer.  For example, the ratchet mechanism that I created from wood (in this automata) would be better 3D printed, I think.  It would be more uniform and more perfect.  Also, the pulleys will be able to be 3D printed, and the motor mounts, and etc.  I’m excited to get the printer.  The filaments that I’ll be working with initially will be PETG and PLA with carbon fiber.  There are many filaments available. It’s exciting and I’m looking forward to learning this new tool

Here are a couple of images:

This shows the three primary modules that make-up this automata.  The base, the drive frame, the electrics module.  Not shown is the biped (well, the rest of it).  Nor is the display platform in this picture.

IMG_20200907_113234-1000.jpg
Here is a close-up of the head.  His eye sockets have been filled with epoxy which gives a sort of gleam in the eye.
PXL_20200916_010451643-1000.jpg
And here is a close-up of the drive belt
PXL_20200916_010441314-1000.jpg
And here is the complete automata.
PXL_20200916_005902922-1000.jpg
In the next few weeks I'll be putting together the videos for these three product spinners, and the other marketing materials that I'll need.  And then I need to hit the road and get one or two rented for the Christmas season.  To me...that's the hard part.
Anyway...I'd love to see what's on your bench.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
creating automata near San Diego, California.


Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

Ron K
 

Hard to write with out simply repeating what others have said. But I do wish you a very speedy recovery. A public thanks for tracking down my misplaced Tinplate Girl purchase. Just another example of what a fine generous person Marc is to run that down for me out of simple kindness. Yes, the magazine will truly be missed. But not as much as the joy you shared with us.

Ron


Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

Automata Magazine
 

Hi Federico,

Thank you for your words of support. It was great working with you and I’m glad we were able to feature your little automata. I’m hoping someone will take on the magazine. Stay tuned. —Marc

On Sep 15, 2020, at 5:08 PM, federico <ffederico@...> wrote:

I throughly enjoyed the magazine and all the correspondence while writing the one article I did. Really Marc, thank you so much for 
your patience and for putting it together. 2020 has been tough for everyone in many ways. Sad to see the magazine go but I'm glad
you are dedicating time and energy into recovering, that's often hard to do. Wishing you the best. :)

Federico


Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

federico
 

I throughly enjoyed the magazine and all the correspondence while writing the one article I did. Really Marc, thank you so much for 
your patience and for putting it together. 2020 has been tough for everyone in many ways. Sad to see the magazine go but I'm glad
you are dedicating time and energy into recovering, that's often hard to do. Wishing you the best. :)

Federico


Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

Automata Magazine
 

Thank you Jim and everyone for your supportive note and kind sentiments. I have hopes of someone coming forward to take up the reins, so stay tuned. We’ll see what happens.

And I want to thank Jim Coffee very much for suggesting this forum and then making it happen. It has been a great asset to Automata Magazine and to the automata community at large.

All best wishes,
Marc

On Sep 14, 2020, at 8:06 PM, Jim Coffee <jim@...> wrote:

I would like to publicly thank Marc for the 12 (and soon to be 13) issues of Automata Magazine.  I have benefitted greatly from many of the articles.  I'm a better person and automatist because of the magazine.  Thanks, Marc.  Wishing you the best.
-Jim Coffee-


Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

Myron Tupa
 

Wild fires, hurricanes, global warming and now this : >(.   Marc, I will miss your beautiful labor of love and wish you all the best in healing and other projects.  You drew newbies like me as well as the best of the best in automata under one wonderful umbrella, AUTOMATA MAGAZINE, Thank you.  I'm sorry I didn't get my article written for the magazine.
Myron Tupa


Re: Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

Jim Larson
 

Couldn't agree more! Although I'm new to automata, the magazine was wonderful. I delighted in each issue. Thanks, Marc, and hope you have a speedy and complete recovery.

               -jim

On 9/14/2020 7:06 PM, Jim Coffee wrote:
I would like to publicly thank Marc for the 12 (and soon to be 13) issues of Automata Magazine.  I have benefitted greatly from many of the articles  I'm a better person and automatist because of the magazine.  Thanks, Marc.  Wishing you the best.
-Jim Coffee-

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Many thanks to Marc for an excellent magazine

 

I would like to publicly thank Marc for the 12 (and soon to be 13) issues of Automata Magazine.  I have benefitted greatly from many of the articles.  I'm a better person and automatist because of the magazine.  Thanks, Marc.  Wishing you the best.
-Jim Coffee-

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