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Re: Automata

V Bass
 

^----   What Gus said. There are several mechanisms that will give a motion that generally matches your description, but may not do exactly what you want. What exactly do you need it to do?


Re: Favorite Suppliers

 

Nice to hear about Cranky Crab.  I look forward to ordering from him one day.  He has some very interesting stuff.
-Jim-

On Sat, 23 Nov 2019 at 17:44, Mike <smc5910@...> wrote:
Since my CNC is down, I purchased three sets of gears from cranky crab workshop, it was a great experience, even the packing filled me with joy. 
--
Looking forward to hearing about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities


Re: What's on my Bench: Bearings

 

Hi Mike...
Regarding costs: 
Regarding incorporation into the automata:  In the past I have:
  • Forced bearing assemblies over wood dowels.  While this does work, maintenance and removal are not easy.  The precision shafting is not expensive and is very precise.  
  • Used stainless shafting and ball bearing assemblies.  This works well.
In the future I will be copper plating at least some of the precision shafts.  The copper plating 'takes the the shafts back in time', it's a nice effect.  And the bearings still slide on and off easily.

Another type of bearing that I use are nylon spacers.  I source them from ServoCity.  When I have a shaft that does full rotation I use ball bearings.  But when I have a shaft that does partial rotation, and that has a relatively light load, I use nylon spacers.

All of us have our own building standards and objectives and goals.  In my case I like "quiet", "smooth", and "longevity".  I maintain an inventory of bearings and spacers that allows me to create without running out.  It's taken me time and money to build the inventory...but at the end of the day I really appreciate not having to slow down and wait for something to arrive in the mail.  And speaking of arriving in the mail...I should mention that I source virtually everything that I use online.  I get sick and tired of driving to somewhere only to find no stock, or out of stock.  
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
San Diego, CA


On Sat, 23 Nov 2019 at 17:41, Mike <smc5910@...> wrote:
Jim, curious as to the cost. Do you incorporate the metal shafts in with the wood or do something entirely different?
--

Thanks!
Mike

Wooden Curiosities


Re: Favorite Suppliers

Mike
 

Since my CNC is down, I purchased three sets of gears from cranky crab workshop, it was a great experience, even the packing filled me with joy. 
--
Looking forward to hearing about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities


Re: What's on my Bench: Bearings

Mike
 

Jim, curious as to the cost. Do you incorporate the metal shafts in with the wood or do something entirely different?
--

Thanks!
Mike

Wooden Curiosities


Re: What's On My Bench - The head of Augustus

Mike
 

It reminds me a bit of Superman's heat vision. :)  I am looking forward to seeing this incorporated into an automata.
--
Looking forward to hearing about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities


Re: What's On My Bench - The head of Augustus

Mario Núñez
 

Very cool.

Mario


Re: Automata

Gus
 

Hi there,
More detail please, what is being moved, what sort of movement, rotation, linear, how far, how fast, uniform speed ?
Can you elaborate ?

Gus


Re: Automata

Paul E Giles Jr
 

Have you looked at a Scotch Yoke? They were once popular on washing machines and used for that back and forth motion. A quick internet search will get you a few .gifs plus some good pictures. All you will have to do is attach a lever to the yoke and you will have your motion.

Paul

On Sat, Nov 23, 2019 at 1:01 PM <strtoneill@...> wrote:
Hi all struggling a little bit with a movement I want to achieve. Clockwise then anticlockwise through 90 degrees. Any help?



--
Paul Giles


Automata

strtoneill@...
 

Hi all struggling a little bit with a movement I want to achieve. Clockwise then anticlockwise through 90 degrees. Any help?


Re: What's On My Bench - The head of Augustus

Randy
 

Hi Jim,

There are a few tricks that are learned with experience. But there is trial and error too. Rapid prototyping is one of the key advantages of 3D printing.
It's fun.

-Randy


Re: What's On My Bench - The head of Augustus

 

Hi Randy...
This is interesting.  I suppose that there are many non-intuitive little tricks and hacks to 3D printing that a non-user (such as myself) would never think of.
Thanks for sharing.  It's appreciated.
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California



On Thu, 21 Nov 2019 at 18:06, Randy <rglissmann@...> wrote:
A dozen or so famous Greek busts have been made available for reproduction using a 3D printer. This link discusses what is available and how they became available. I thought it would be interesting to embed a LED inside the head so to have glowing eyes. I imported the head's STL file into Fusion 360 and created a hollow space inside the head for a LED. I printed the modified STL file up to the eyes, then paused the printer and inserted the LED. Finally, I resumed the printing of the head. Here are photos of my low resolution test prints.


What's On My Bench - The head of Augustus

Randy
 

A dozen or so famous Greek busts have been made available for reproduction using a 3D printer. This link discusses what is available and how they became available. I thought it would be interesting to embed a LED inside the head so to have glowing eyes. I imported the head's STL file into Fusion 360 and created a hollow space inside the head for a LED. I printed the modified STL file up to the eyes, then paused the printer and inserted the LED. Finally, I resumed the printing of the head. Here are photos of my low resolution test prints.


What's on my Bench: Bearings

 

Good morning...
I've got two automata projects on my bench right now, Inclined Slide and Electric Chair.  Each of these automata will use bearings.
In the image below you see five bearings:
  • The top 3 are linear bearings.  Inside the outer sleeve are four races of small bearing balls.  I will be using these bearings in the Inclined Slide automata...there will be four of them that hold the seat that the biped will be sliding back and forth.  As these bearings slide/roll along the 6mm shaft they make more noise than I was expecting.  It will be interesting to see if they quiet down over time. I source these from ServoCity.com.
  • The lower 2 bearings are one way bearings.  I will be using these in both the Inclined Slide and Electric Chair automata.  I use them as clutches.  This enables me to operate automata with both a hand crank and a motor.  The two clutches isolate the crank and the motor from each other.  I source these from VXB.com.
I maintain a stock of stainless steel precision shafting in sizes 1/8, 3/16, and 1/4".  These are ordered in 12" lengths.  I would prefer to use precision hardwood shafting...but it is not available.  None of the wood dowels that I use fit properly into the bearings.
And I maintain a stock of ball bearing assemblies (1/8" ID-1/4" OD, 3/16" ID -3/8" OD , and 1/4" ID-1/2" OD  ) in both flanged and unflanged configurations.
The motors that I use are 60 rpm gear motors. I personally think that a hand crank speed of 60-90 rpm is desirable.  Using a motor of 60 rpm permits the use of one input shaft.
IMG_20191120_071600-1000.jpg
Cheers
-Jim Coffee-
one of the Automata Group Moderators
I create automata near San Diego, California



Re: What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

 

Hi Randy...and everyone:
I find this additive printing very fascinating.  I don't do it myself (yet) but am really enjoying and appreciating how additive printing is emerging into our society.  This is a brand new tool that our species is learning how to use.  Just off the top of my head I've seen plastic (of course), skin, food, metal including titanium, concrete...and I'm sure that there are many more things.  It will be interesting to watch how additive printing enters the field of automata.
Thanks for showing us what's on your bench, Randy
--
-Jim Coffee-
creating automata near San Diego, California
one of the group moderators
JamesCoffee.com


Re: What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

 

Nice video...I especially like the close-ups of the innards.  I love all the metal.
Thanks for sharing.
-Jim-

On Tue, 19 Nov 2019 at 17:25, Mike <smc5910@...> wrote:
Randy,

You "may" appreciate this, in regards to fluid motion mechanisms: 
http://www.francoisjunod.com/2015/12/14/automates-tapis-volant/

At times, the 3D modeling process boggles my mind. I am grateful for those who can think in that dimension. 
--
Looking forward to hearing about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities


Re: What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

Mike
 

Randy,

You "may" appreciate this, in regards to fluid motion mechanisms: 
http://www.francoisjunod.com/2015/12/14/automates-tapis-volant/

At times, the 3D modeling process boggles my mind. I am grateful for those who can think in that dimension. 
--
Looking forward to hearing about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities


Re: What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

Randy
 

I use Fusion 360 to design and create STL files and then Cura to slice the object into layers that the 3D printer uses. I'm totally amazed at what can be done using Fusion and it's free for hobbyists.


Re: What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

Mike
 

Hello Randy and welcome to the forum! I hope you enjoy your time here and I look forward to interacting with you. You have alot of interesting gadgets in the background. :)

That is an impressive automata you are building and a very interesting combinations of technology.  What software do you use to model the 3D files that you print?
--
Looking forward to hearing more about your automata adventures!


Mike

Wooden Curiosities


What's On My Bench - Kinetic Sculpture

Randy
 

This is my first posting. I'm working on a kinetic sculpture for wall mounting that incorporates timing belts and stepper motors to rotate U shapes. The belts cause the shapes move synchronously in each column and a microprocessor controls the rotation angle, rate, and direction of each column. I plan to have different patterns of movement to replicate the undulations of water ripples or the wind blowing a wheat field. I've completely moved from wood to using a 3D printer for my creations. I'm easily distracted into making other things but now I have a deadline for submitting this sculpture in a local art show.

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